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EXAMINING EXECUTIVE POLICIES


then Minister for Environment and Forests Mr Jairam Ramesh thanked Mr Siva for his role played by the Committee in sensitizing the Ministry for Environment and Forests for taking into account the opinion of the Ministry of MSME. It was more interesting that such a major policy formulation could be re-examined by the Ministry of Environment and Forests merely because the Industry Committee took up the matter. Without even having to submit a report to Parliament, Department- related parliamentary standing committees made an impact on government policies.


When the Nuclear Liability Bill was framed by the government it altered certain amounts to be paid by suppliers of nuclear technology to victims of nuclear accidents. The Bill was examined by the Parliamentary Committee on Science


Houses accepted it and it became law. The role played by these Committees in examining public policies and recommending changes to Parliament conveyed their impact. While examining the implementation of the Prime Minister’s Employment Generation Programme (PMEGP) in Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the department- related parliamentary standing committee on industry suggested that the scope of the PMEGP, which was confined to the non-farm sector, could be broadened to include trade and retail shops.


By advancing such a


recommendation the Committee made it possible for people wanting to become entrepreneurs to be covered by PMEGP with its scope broadened to issue such loans. It is inspiring to note that the government agreed to expand the scope of the PMEGP and now people who want to establish small shops can apply for a PMEGP loan.


Examples of government decisions in foreign Parliaments


Government decisions regarding deploying troops to Iraq and Afghanistan were never discussed in countries such as France, Germany, Australia and the U.K.


However, of late opposition parties in these countries were now demanding that such issues be discussed in their respective Parliaments. They argued that when the life of its armed forces was put at stake by the decision of their governments to deploy them in war-torn countries, it was important that such decisions be discussed in legislative bodies.


his actions, the opinion of the Ministry of MSME was taken into account before notifying the E-waste rules. Mr Siva felt that if 75 per cent of E-waste


was managed by many medium and small enterprises, it was important to factor their opinion in the E-waste rules. It is interesting to note that the


and Technology of the Rajya Sabha, who recommended for a substantial improvement of the compensation awarded to victims. Eventually, both


The willingness of the respective governments to discuss such policies in Legislatures was welcomed by political parties and the academic community, who felt that a more democratic content was given to the Executive decisions by discussing public policies in Legislatures. It is a welcome trend in favour of the role of the Parliament for fine tuning public policies.


The Parliamentarian | 2013: Issue Three | 193


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