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Convene Salary Survey 2013 68+32+x


89+11+x 55+45+x 76+4+6+14+x


100+74+73+48+81 40+22+4+34+x


51+21+28+x


EXPERIENCE 68 percent of respondents are age 40 or older; 64 percent have more than 10 years of meeting- management experience. The average salary for meeting professionals with 1–3 years of experience is $50,625; 4–5 years, $57,083; 6–8 years, $60,000; 9–10 years, $69,018; more than 10 years, $87,746.


WOMEN VS. MEN A majority of respondents (89 percent) are female. While men are in the minority, their take-home pay is significantly higher: $108,482 on average, compared to women’s average annual salary of $73,996.


EDUCATION More than half of respondents (55 percent) have at least a college degree, while 11 percent have an advanced degree.


CERTIFICATIONS More than three-quarters (76 percent) of respon- dents have earned the CMP (Certified Meeting Professional) designation; 4 percent have earned a CAE (Certified Association Executive); and 6 per- cent have earned a CMM (Certification in Meet- ing Management). The average salary for those respondents with a CMP was $84,865, compared to $70,557 for those without the CMP designation.


ROLE The average salary for an association executive: $115,156; association meeting professional: $74,218; corporate meeting professional: $73,633; government meeting professional: $48,333; independent meeting professional: $81,250.


MANAGEMENT More than one-third of respondents (40 percent) are managers, followed by directors (22 percent). Four percent are at the VP level. More than half of respondents (61 percent) supervise a staff, while 36 percent supervise more than two employees.


WORKWEEK More than half (51 percent) work an average of between 41 and 50 hours a week; 21 percent log 51 to 60 hours weekly.


18+82+x 60 PCMA CONVENE JUNE 2013


21+19+19+41+x 49+51+x


65+35+x 9+91+x


PAY RAISES Sixty-five percent — vs. 54 percent in last year’s survey — received an increase in pay in 2013. Only 2 percent of respondents reported that their salaries decreased in 2013. Twenty-four percent (about the same as last year’s survey) said their salaries remained flat, but 10 percent expect it to increase sometime this year. Raises were primar- ily due to regular salary increases (67 percent); 10 percent received a promotion this year. Sixty percent expect a raise next year.


ALMOST DOUBLE-DIGIT INCREASES The average salary change in 2013 over 2012 was a significant 9.4-percent increase. The average salary increase in 2012 was only 2.26 percent. The average salary for all respondents in 2013 was $77,711, up from an average 2012 salary of $71,038 (reported in last year’s Salary Survey).


SALARY RANGES Twenty-one percent of respondents are in the $70,000-to-$84,999 range; 19 percent are in the $60,000-to-$69,999 range; and 19 percent earn more than $100,000 annually.


SATISFACTION Nearly half of respondents (49 percent) report that they are satisfied with their current salary; 43 percent expressed dissatisfaction. Three-quarters of respondents are satisfied with their specific jobs, and 86 percent said that they are satisfied with the meetings profession as a whole.


LOCATION While respondents work at locations throughout North America, they were most likely to be based in the Washington, D.C., area (18 percent), fol- lowed by the Chicago market (12 percent) and New York City (2 percent). Sixty-eight percent of respondents live and work in other areas of North America: Northeast, 14 percent; Midwest/Central, 27 percent; South, 38 percent; West, 14 percent; and Canada, 7 percent.


STRATEGIC MEETINGS MANAGEMENT (SMM) Only 18 percent of respondents have an SMM plan in place.


› —Michelle Russell, Editor in Chief


The salary survey was conducted by Lewis&Clark, lewisclarkinc.com, and sponsored by DMAI’s empowerMINT.com. All material © 2013 by PCMA. This survey, conducted in March 2013, was completed by 328 respondents.


PCMA.ORG


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