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Organization in Houston, which in- cludes networks of individual ACO practices and partnerships between hospitals and ACO professionals, with 332 physicians;


• Methodist Patient Centered ACO in Dallas, comprising ACO group prac- tices, networks of individual ACO practices, and partnerships between hospitals and ACO professionals, with 269 physicians;


• Essential Care Partners in Austin, a federally qualified health center, with 275 physicians;


• Physicians ACO in Houston, which includes networks of individual ACO practices, with 75 physicians; and


• Texoma ACO, in Wichita Falls, which includes ACO group practices and networks of individual ACO practices, with 52 physicians.


All of the new ACOs will serve Medi-


care beneficiaries. CMS’ shared-savings program offers


medical groups, hospitals, and feder- ally qualified health centers financial incentives for quality improvement and cost control. An additional 38 organiza- tions already were operating under oth- er Medicare accountable care contracts.


patient safety measures that focus on complications. The measures address a range of


quality concerns, including medication safety, venous thromboembolism, surgi- cal safety, and care coordination. “Improving patient safety is a cor- nerstone of NQF’s mission to advance health care quality,” said Janet Corrigan, president and chief executive officer of NQF.


Medical errors and unsafe care kill


NQF endorses complications-related patient safety measures


The National Quality Forum (NQF) Board of Directors in June endorsed


THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT AYA Healthy Survivorship


• 1 in every 640 young adults is a childhood cancer survivor


• More than 72,000 adolescent and young adults (AYAs) ages 15-39 are diagnosed with cancer each year in the US


tens of thousands of Americans each year. For example, an estimated 2 mil- lion health care-associated infections occur each year in the United States, accounting for approximately 90,000 deaths. “Preventable errors in health care are costing Americans in a number of ways, whether in premiums, lost work time and wages, or undue stress and anxiety for patients and families,” said William A. Conway, MD, senior vice president and chief quality officer at Henry Ford Health System and cochair of the Patient Safety-Complications Steering Commit- tee. “This measure set will ensure the health care community has the right measurement tools to help alleviate these burdens and provide patients with high-quality care.” The endorsed measures include mea-


sures from the National Committee on Quality Assurance, the Joint Commis- sion, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Ambulatory Surgi- cal Center Quality Collaboration. They cover:


How many are in your practice?


Share the free AYA Healthy Survivorship iPhone app with your patients today.


Learn more about the free app and templates for AYA survivorship plans by visiting www.healthysurvivorship.org.


For information on AYA cancer survivor navigation and services, contact Seton Healthcare Family’s Survivor Center at 512.324.9652 or visit seton.net/survivorship.


PRESENTED BY DOWNLOAD THE APP


• High-risk medications in the elderly; • Intensive care unit venous thrombo- embolism prophylaxis;


• Postoperative pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis rate;


• Wrong site, wrong side, wrong pa- tient, wrong procedure, and wrong implant situations;


• Accidental puncture or laceration rate;


• Foreign body left after procedure; • Patient burn; • Iatrogenic pneumothorax rate; and • Transfusions reaction. n


48 TEXAS MEDICINE September 2012


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