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PAGE 10 JUNE 2012


june Best days according to Moon phases. Best plant g da


est p a ting days Above g ound crops


e ground crops . . .


Root crops . . . . . . . . . . . . Seed beds . . . . . . . . . . . . Kill plant pests . . . . . . . . .


Best fishing days


 Best . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3, 11-13, 30  Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7, 9-10, 20-21, 29  Fair: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5, 8, 16, 24-25  Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15, 17-19, 22-23, 26-28


Best days to do other stuff Begin diet to gain weight . . . . . . . . . . . .


Begin diet to lose weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . Begin logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breed animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make sauerkraut, can, or pickle . . . . . . . Cut hair to discourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hair to encourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Destroy pests and weeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go camping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go to the dentist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graft or pollinate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harvest above ground vegetables . . . . Harvest below ground vegetables . . . . Plant above ground vegetables . . . . . . . Plant below ground vegetables . . . . . . . Prune to discourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Prune to encourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Quit smoking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Set posts or pour concrete . . . . . . . . . . . Start projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wean animals and children . . . . . . . . . . .


1-3, 20-21, 26-30 6-8, 11-13, 16-17 1-3, 20-21, 29-30 14-15, 18


1-3 20-21 26-30


Folksy Tips, Hints & Wisdom FOR FARM, HOME AND GARDEN


Don’t throw in the trowel Tips for gardening with arthritis


for gardeners with arthritis, the bending, pulling and kneeling associated with most chores is excruciatingly painful.


A


25, 29 10, 15 5-6


1-2, 20, 29 10-11 15-16 27-28 12-13 12, 14 3-4


24-25 20-21 24-25 15-16


1-2, 29-30 10-11 12-13 22-23 10, 15 5-6 20


10-15 —from the Old Farmer’s Almanac


Fortunately, not every arthritic gardener must throw in the trowel. Nowadays there are many techniques and tools designed specifically for gardeners with limited mobility. These suggestions


may not cure your ills completely, but they will keep you active in the garden a while longer.


1. Maintain range of motion through daily exercise and stretching. Walking, cardio and weight lifting are excellent options.


2. Think about the movements you make while gardening (squatting, etc.), and incorporate these actions into your daily exercise routine.


3. Garden at the time of day you feel most limber. Be careful in the morning, though. Most back injuries occur in the morning when our joints are “cold” and not fully hydrated.


4. Practice stretching in the opposite direction of the intended motion.


5. Try to break gardening chores into segments so you won’t overdo it. For any activity over 30 minutes, get up and change positions or walk around a few minutes.


6. Buy ergonomic tools that are enhanced with longer handles and easier grips that make certain chores easier. A good resource iswww.arthritissupplies.com.


7. Try raised bed gardening. By elevating the height of your garden bed and making it narrow enough to reach across, you will avoid excessive bending and straining. Raised beds can be constructed of almost any material that will hold dirt—concrete blocks, lumber, bales of hay or old watering troughs. Just remember, the taller your bed, the less you have to bend. You can also bring the garden to you by planting assorted vegetables in containers on your porch, in a sunny window, or near your door.


Happy gardening!


t some point we will all know the “snap, crackle and pop” of stiff joints. But


CEC


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