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PAGE 6 JUNE 2012 PLAY IT SAFE


Parents need to buckle down Kids ride in car seats, no ‘buts’ about it.


dashboard. A child will also be lower in the seat causing the air bag to hit higher on their head. This causes head, neck, and eye injuries to be more probable and severe. The front seat belts are designed for adults so a child will not be secured properly. An air bag causes a rear-facing child safety seat to be thrown into the back of the seat. The back seat offers more protection from debris, glass, and projectiles.


BY GUY DALE coordinator of safety & loss control


this realize how dangerous this is for their children.


I


Let me explain: A front airbag deploys at up to 200 mph. Sudden braking usually occurs just before the collision causing the passenger to go forward. A child is lighter weight and their core and neck muscles are not as strong causing them to go forward more than an adult. This in turn creates a worse collision with the air bag. An unrestrained or improperly restrained child can easily be thrown from the vehicle through the windshield or tossed into the


‘ve been noticing something that troubles me deeply: Little children in the front seat, and they are not in a car seat. I wonder if the people doing


I understand that children get disgruntled about a car seat, or don’t like being in the back alone while mom or dad is in the front. I know that children whine and cry sometimes when they are restrained to a seat. My wife and I raised four children and have three grandchildren. I’m no stranger to their protests.


Fortunately, there are tactics you can use that will help. The best one is strict compliance: If a child realizes there is no other choice but to sit in a car seat when riding in a vehicle, then they’ll never know there is something they might like better.


The following safety guidelines should help you understand the best position in the car for your child:


UNTIL AGE 1(or 20 lbs) - For the best possible protection keep infants in the back seat, in rear-facing child safety seats, as long as possible up to the height or weight limit of their particular seat. At a minimum, keep infants rear facing until at least 1 year of age and at least 20 lbs.


UNTIL AGE 4 (or 40 lbs.) - When children outgrow their rear-facing seats, (at least 1 year old and at least 20 lbs.) they should ride in forward-facing child safety seats placed in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of the particular seat, usually around age 4 or 40 lbs.


UNTIL AGE eight OR 4’9” TALL - Once children outgrow their forward-facing seats (around age 4 or 40 lbs), they should ride in booster seats in the back seat until the vehicle seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt fits across the chest (usually at age 8 or when the children are 4’9” tall).


AFTER AGE 8 OR 4’9” TALL - When children outgrow their booster seats, they can use the adult seat belts in the back seat, if they fit properly. The lap belt should lay across the upper thighs with the shoulder belt fitting across the chest.


The next time your child hollers about being buckled up or put in a car seat, and you think it might be okay to let it slide, remember your child’s biggest protection from danger is you. Instead, place them in the car seat, look them in the eye and say, “I love you and this is what is best for you.” If you are ever involved in an accident, you will be glad you cared.


Free safety and CPR courses available from CEC


Choctaw Electric offers CPR training and safety classes for groups and organizations at no charge. Please contact Guy Dale to schedule a free presentation today. 800-780-6486, ext. 227.


We offer low interest loans for small and large appliances.


Contact Choctaw Electric Cooperative today for complete details. 


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