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details DESIGN


Conversion Saves Big With Small Coring JITEN SHAH, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & ANALYSIS, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS


CASTING PROFILE


Cast Component: Shank pivot mount. Casting Process: Green sand. Material: ADI grade 1. Weight: 41.8 lbs. Dimensions: 19 x 13 x 6.5 in.


to ADI increased the strength of the part, and casting design enhancements by supplier Dotson Iron Castings, Mankato, Minn., reduced the weight by 9 lbs. and provided a 26% cost savings. T e features of the casting and ultimate benefi ts to the customer helped earn the casting Best-In-Class recognition in this year’s AFS and Metal Casting Design & Purchasing Casting Competition.


C BOX-SHAPED WELDMENT DESIGN


onverting to an austempered ductile iron (ADI) casting from a 15-piece welded steel fabrication brought strength to an agricul- ture equipment part that must handle heavy force. T e shank pivot mount for a tillage system carries the force of the shank on the implement tool bar as it is pulled through the ground. T e switch


Competition Winner Highlight:


Switching to single center I-beam web section eliminates core needed with original design’s box-like cross section.


• An I-beam with a web and small fl ange can provide the same or better strength than a box shape and improve castability. T e orientation of the feature with reference to the parting plane, box section wall thickness, internal space between the walls, and overall length and width are key drivers in choosing an I-beam feature.


• By orienting the feature so the parting plane goes through its web section, the pattern can be stripped from the mold without creating backdraft.


• Design engineers must fi nd creative design options at the conceptual stage, backed with trade-off analysis and value engineering to select the optimal solution. In this case, the box cross section would have required a thin core, which would be unstable and diffi cult to cast.


22 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | May/Jun 2012


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