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Agricultural Industry


research and development aimed at an even more efficient solution for drying grain, corn, rapeseed, rice, sunflowers, and other cereals.


Uniformity of aeration is achieved by dividing the product flow and rearranging the supply air roofs and exhaust air roofs. At the same time the diagonal arrangement of the roof rows ensures an absolutely uniform distribution of the air over the product to be dried (Figure 2). Maximum absorption of moisture, i.e., maximum saturation of the exhaust air, combined with efficient heat insulation of the grain column add up to substantial savings in the generation of air used for the drying. Less air needs to be heated and conveyed, and the heat losses through the housing are also lower. Eco Dry thus solves all the previously mentioned problems associated with conventional roof column driers.


Eco Dry and Eco Cool


An even bigger saving in energy compared to conventional driers is possible when the Eco Dry drier is equipped in addition with the Eco Cool continuous-flow cooler, likewise from Schmidt- Seeger. In this case the savings potential lies at up to 20%. The idea is based on the "dry aeration principle". The pre-dried product is transferred (in an uncooled state) from the drier to the cooler with a moisture content of 17%. Here the maize is subjected to temperature control for a long period. In this process the stored heat is used to expel the water. Through subsequent aeration in the cooling zone, the Eco Cool then removes the residual moisture from the product (Figure 3). Eco Dry and Eco Cool have been used successfully over the


Figure 3: Eco Dry and Eco Cool


past four years under working conditions. Examples are shown in the following pictures of an Eco Dry plant for wheat, an Eco Dry plant for maize (corn) and a combined Eco Dry + Eco Cool plant.


Other innovations introduced over the past few years include the concave form of the roofs, which ensures that the same amount of air flows around each grain, and the pneumatic drier discharge. During discharge it is important above all to prevent bridging in the product flow, which in the worst-case scenario can cause the product to overheat. It must be certain that every grain spends the same amount of time in the drier regardless of whether it passes through along the edge or in the centre.


www.solidsandbulk.co.uk


May 2012 • Solids & Bulk Handling 11


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