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Corporate Social Responsibility St. Louis A Long History of Social Responsibility


Givingbacktothepeopleandcharitableorgan- izations that make St. Louis such a great place to live, work, and meet has long been a tradi- tion in the city known as the Gateway to the West. Groups that choose the destination for their meetings and events can get into the same gen- erous spirit by participating in a variety of CSR- focused activities that give back to the community. Food-outreach charities, children’s organiza-


tions, and pet-rescue services are just a few of the charities that have benefited from groups vis- iting St. Louis. Circle K International, a Kiwanis service leadership program,donated nearly 4,000 hours of service prior to its St. Louis convention, when members volunteered with four different organizations, including Cardinal Glennon Chil- dren’s Medical Hospital, the “Garden of Eaten” Community Garden, Habitat for Humanity, and the local Boys & Girls Club. When the American Society of Association


Executives (ASAE) met in St. Louis last year, atten- dees took part in a dog-treat-baking workshop, volunteered at a doggie day spa,and participated in a 5K run/walk for Stray Rescue of St. Louis, a local nonprofit benefiting homeless animals.And during the recent gathering of the National Soci- ety of Black Engineers, members volunteered their time for a variety of causes. In addition to hosting a science fair for science and engineer- ing students, the group set up a cell-phone recy-


A recent revitalization has brought more than $5 billion in new developments to downtown.


cling drive in support of domestic violence pre- vention programs, volunteered at St.Patrick Cen- ter, which provides life-skills training for the mentally ill and homeless, and served lunch at Gateway Homeless Services. 


 DOGGIE DO


GOODERS: ASAE meeting attendees


shower love on a pup during a CSR activity benefiting Stray


Rescue of St. Louis.


GATEWAY: St. Louis’ walkable and afford-


able downtown offers more than 8,000 hotel rooms within steps of the 1.2-million-square- foot America’s Center Convention Complex. And there’s always


something new to dis- cover—a recent revi- talization has brought


more than $5 billion in new developments to downtown.


At a Glance Convention facilities: America’s Center Con- vention Complex includes 502,000 square feet of contiguous exhibit space in six halls, the 67,000-seat Edward Jones Dome, the 1,411-seat Ferrara Theatre, 83-plus meeting rooms, and a 28,000-square-foot ballroom. Number of hotel rooms within walking dis- tance of convention center: 8,000 Totalnumber of hotelrooms: 39,000 Attractions:The GatewayArch, Missouri Botan- ical Garden, Saint Louis Zoo, Busch Stadium, Laumeier Sculpture Park, The Magic House St. Louis Children’s Museum,Grant’s Farm,and his- toric neighborhoods


For More Information Call (800) 325-7962 or visitwww.explorestlouis.com


90


pcma convene April 2012


www.pcma.org


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