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TEAMING UP: The Endocrine Society has focused on collaborat- ing with other medical societies for industry grants. Said Wanda Johnson, CMP, CAE, senior director of meetings and education:“We’re looking for collaborative projects where we can engage in larger initiatives that bigger organizations may be able to help pull together.”


tallied in the billions of dollars. That, combined with the threat of jail time and negative public perception hanging in the air, has caused a number of pharmaceutical and medical- device companies to reduce their CME programming. Most have shrunk their medical education budgets, and many are accepting fewer grant proposals or putting strict parameters onthe types of proposals they’ll accept. What that means is today’s medical-meeting profession-


als are working harder for fewer industry dollars. “There’s more competition for a finite number of dollars,” said Har- wood, who this year is tasked with putting on essentially the same Clinical Fellows Meeting as in years past, but with a budget that’s $100,000 less. To obtain the necessary rev- enue, Harwood and her staff are submitting multiple grant proposals. It’s time-consuming and laborious, and Harwood and other planners say their small staffs are struggling under the workload. At the same time, Harwood said she can’t risk becoming


consumed by the grants process, because she has to keep one eye on the horizon. Revenue streams are shifting and a


TIMELINE: INDUSTRY-BACKED CME


The Rise and Fall of Industry- Backed CME


A chronology of the regulations, standards, and guidelines that govern, guide, and restrict industry- provider relations.


2002


 The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the leading trade association for phar- maceutical and biotech companies, releases its Code on Inter- action with Health Care Professionals. The Code is designed to govern relations between industry representatives and health-care providers, and to ensure there is no undue influ- ence to prescribe or recommend certain medications.


 44 pcmaconvene April 2012 www.pcma.org


new generation of learners is entering the ranks of CME attendees. The CME of tomorrow will not be the CME of yesterday, or even today. To remain relevant, planners must make strategic choices today that will help them navigate the current system and also prepare them for a new para- digm for CME funding. “We should all care about this,” Harwood said, “because those of us who do not adjust and figure out how to deal with this will be out of a job.”


“There’s more competition for a finite number of dollars.”


The Shrinking Pool Drug and medical-device makers have long been key sources of revenue for CME providers. In 1998, the first year the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) beganpublishing data onaccredited CME pro- gram revenue, industry support was nearly $302 million, or 33 percent of total revenue. By 2007, industry support had increased by 300 percent, to $1.2 billion—47 percent of


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