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A DISASTER OF EPIC PROPORTIONS: Nearly 1,700 emergency-management professionals walked the IDCE2012 trade-show floor. One-hundred sixty-nine companies exhibited; their booths filled two ofthe convention center’s exhibit halls.


[under the European model] the center outright owns the show, [while we are] a partnership,” Hemphill said. “Both parties bring their expertise and services to the table, the idea being, in doing so, costs typically associated with the show are reduced and we share a little bit more risk. As a result, we both enjoy bigger rewards in the long run.” How exactly does the partnership cut costs? By sharing resources to operatemore efficiently. Instead of hiring its own


of the success of IDCE2012 were due to the relationships the facility had with the lieutenant governor. That went a long way in helping us build the alliances we had to make this work.”


On_the_Web


To learn more about the International Disaster Conference & Expo, visit internationaldisaster conference.com.


food-and-beverage director, for example, IDCE would use the center’s F&B director. Beyond budgetary concerns, the part- nership serves a political role in helping forge relationships and bringing in big-name speakers. “When we tried to do the show in 2009, we weren’t in a position to build some of the part- nerships that the facility [has helped us] bring in,” Mouton said. “The political relationships that played such a big part


70 pcma convene April 2012


A Conference Is Born On Jan. 17–19, IDCE2012 opened its doors to more than 1,600 emergency-management professionals from 27 coun- tries. Beyond a trade show with more than 169 companies tak- ing two of the center’s cavernous exhibit halls—displaying everything from portable housing units to emergency com- mand vehicles — IDCE2012 offered an educational confer- ence portion with 58 sessions, networking events, a Mardi Gras Recovery Gala, and general sessions helmed by big-name speakers who would appeal even to the general public. The opening keynoter was W. Craig Fugate, administra-


tor of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Other speakers included Tom Ridge, the first secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Meir Elran, director of the Homeland Security Program at the Tel Aviv University Institute for National Security Studies; and Russel L. Hon- oré, a now-retired U.S. Army lieutenant general who served as commander of Joint Task Force Katrina, coordinating military relief efforts in the aftermath of the devastating hurricane. Even though the conference lined up a large number of local


speakers, a multitude of international participants brought their experiences and perspectives to the table, broadening the show’s reach. “There were a number of discussions about the Japan earthquake, the response to Haiti, and other topics that


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