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LAS VEGAS MEETINGS BY CAESARS ENTERTAINMENT


Alternative Venues a Sure Bet D


ON’T WANT TO gamble when bringing your next


meeting to Las Vegas? Go with the sure bet. By partnering with Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertainment, plan- ners reap the benefits of eight premier properties that work as one, and are committed to fulfill- ing each group’s needs. One call or email opens the doors to Bally’s Las Vegas, Caesars Palace, Flamingo Las Vegas, Harrah’s Las Vegas, Impe- rial Palace, Paris Las Vegas, Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino, and Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino. That’s more than one million square feet of meeting space, 23,000-plus guest rooms and suites, and a dynamic array of dining, entertainment, and leisure options. It all comes with the convenience of one contact, one contract, and one food-and-beverage mini- mum — as well as the highest level of flexibility and simplicity in offering attendees a diverse Las Vegas experience.


In addition to “mixing and matching” function


space, planners can choose from more than 120 alternative venues for their events — including restaurants, lounges, and nightclubs — across any and all Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertain- ment properties, and apply a portion of their spending to their food-and-beverage minimum. This lack of restriction is unprecedented within and beyond the Las Vegas market, and gives event organizers of all types true freedom to leverage their spending at a variety of venues. Qualifying for alternative venue credit is easy.


Events must have a minimum of 15 guests, and a minimum spend of $1,500 must be met. Planners just provide documentation of the applicable event(s) by credit card or master account charge/ receipt. It’s that simple.


88 pcma convene May 2011


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SWEET: The Sugar Factory American Brasserie, at Paris Las Vegas (left), is the newest addition to the alternative venues pro- gram from Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertainment.


Chateau Nightclub & Gardens, the newest addi-


tion to Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertain- ment’s alternative venues family, opened at Paris Las Vegas on March 5. Spanning more than 45,000 square feet and two stories, the high-energy night- club and Parisian gardens — the only nightclub located directly on the Las Vegas Strip — brings a new dimension to Vegas nightlife with its premium location, breathtaking terraces, and lavish décor. Its outdoor gardens offer magnificent open-air views for a nightlife experience unlike any other. Also new at Paris Las Vegas is Sugar Factory


American Brasserie, which made its greatly antici- pated debut on March 4. The 30,000-square-foot space houses an expansive restaurant and dining room, a 6,000-square-foot retail store, the decadent Chocolate Lounge, and more, as it serves up deli- cious cuisine 24 hours a day, seven days a week. ■


AT A GLANCE


Guest rooms and suites: 23,000+ Meeting space: One million square feet of meeting space in eight resorts — Bally’s Las Vegas, Caesars Palace, Flamingo Las Vegas, Harrah’s Las Vegas, Imperial Palace Las Vegas, Paris Las Vegas, Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino, and Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino — plus a wide variety of unique alternative venues For more information: Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertainment; (877) MEET- 702; LVMeetings@Caesars.com; www.LVMeetingsbyCaesars.com


www.pcma.org


PRIVATE INDULGENCE: Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace (top) offers the luxury and privacy of the Krug room as part of the alternative venues pro- gram from Las Vegas Meetings by Caesars Entertainment.


LEFT PHOTO COURTESY PARIS LAS VEGAS; RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY CAESARS PALACE


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