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TALKING STICK RESORT


Property Surpasses All Expectations W


INNING MEETINGS ARE the watchword at Scottsdale’s Talking


Stick Resort, an enterprise of the Salt River Pima–Maricopa Indian Community. And that’s in more ways than one.


When it comes to business, the property surpasses expectations, with more than 100,000 square feet of indoor/outdoor conference space. The 25,000-square-foot Salt River Grand Ballroom offers the latest technology and full-service catering, as do 22 state-of-the-art meeting rooms. Accommodations and amenities, too, set the bar higher. In addition to 497 deluxe rooms, including 15 luxury suites and 38 executive kings, guests enjoy several upscale amenities, such as a rejuve- nating spa, five world-class restaurants, six enter- tainment lounges, a 240,000-square-foot gaming floor, and two pools. Exceptional guest service features courteous valets and knowledgeable concierges, as well as pool-cabana reservations. A cultural display allows guests to learn more about the Pima and Maricopa tribes. The resort’s two pools aren’t simply pools;


rather, they rank among its most dramatic fea- tures. Lined along the main pool, cabanas offer privacy and upgraded services, such as spa treat- ments and in-cabana dining. After soaking up the sun, guests can retreat to the 13,000-square-foot, full-service spa. High on the 14th floor, the luxuri- ous Spa at Talking Stick has 11 private massage rooms, steam and sauna rooms, relaxation and serenity lounges, and a fitness-training facility. Talking Stick Resort also serves up five restau-


rants: Wandering Horse Buffet, a multi-station inter- national buffet; the Blue Coyote, a 24-hour café; the Coffee Garden, a barista bar with baked goods; and Ocean Trail, a sophisticated seafood bar with fresh, Cajun-style cuisine. But the resort’s most prized dining experience is the exclusive, 15th-floor Orange Sky restaurant, which serves up aged beef


80 pcma convene May 2011  


IN THE GAME: Talking Stick Resort has 700 of the latest slot machines on its casino floor, as well as table games including blackjack, Casino War, and three-card poker.


and fresh seafood along with 360-degree valley views. In addition to the dining room, Orange Sky has a wine-tasting room and a chef’s room, where the chef will prepare several courses exclusively for a party. Guests can also choose from an array of entertainment options, including the 650-seat Showroom, hosting live entertainment. Other enter- tainment hotspots are Players, a themed sports bar, and Shadows, a sophisticated cigar and martini bar. But perhaps the most unique amenity at Talk- ing Stick Resort is its 240,000 square feet of gam- ing, comprised of more than 700 high-tech slot machines and two high-limit rooms. The non- smoking card room offers such games as Texas and Omaha Hold ‘Em and Seven-Card Stud, while more than 50 table games include blackjack, three-card poker, and Let It Ride — all available to guests all day, every day. ■


AT A GLANCE


Hotel rooms: 497 deluxe rooms, including 15 luxury and 38 executive king suites Meeting facilities: More than 100,000 square feet of indoor/outdoor conference space Amenities: Two pools, 240,000 square feet of casino gaming, live entertainment in the 650-seat Showroom, Spa at Talking Stick, nightclub, five restaurants, cigar and martini bar


For more information: Talking Stick Resort, Steven Horowitz, Director of Sales; (480) 850-7777 or (877) 724-4687; sales@talkingstickresort.com; www.talkingstickresort.com


www.pcma.org


SPACE GALORE: The resort’s conference center has 12 state- of-the-art confer- ence rooms, plus a 25,000-square-foot grand ballroom.


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