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You can still use the same marking principal using the smaller types of turrets/adjusters, including the coin- slot variety by using a small round adhesive sticker or even small dabs of different coloured paint to mark each distance. There are two types of elevation adjustments that give you either ⅛ inch or ¼ inch per click at 100 yards and for what we do the ¼ inch versions are the ones to go for if you have the choice,


Choosing & using sights by Gwyn Roberts


on the internet. More and more scopes are becoming available where the parallax adjustment is made by a dial located on the side of the main body of the scope although it is not generally considered to be as accurate as the AO ring system.


Barska and Burris


as they require less movement when dialing in the distances which in turn helps reduce wear and tear in the long run.


Moving up to the front end of the scope and you will usually have the option of either a 40, 42, 44, 50 or 56mm diameter objective lens. The 50mm variety are very popular in GR as they allow more light in than the smaller versions and they are usually combined with a one-inch body-tube, which helps to keep the overall weight of your rifle down.


Most of the scopes that offer a 56mm objective lens will use a 30mm body, which will transmit more light when shooting in poor weather or light conditions but they are generally a lot heavier than the one inch versions, so keep this in mind before opting for one. I use two 6 – 25x by 56mm Millett scopes with 30mm bodies on my precision rifles (for 1500 & shorts etc) and whilst they certainly do the job, I really could do without the extra weight that they add onto my rifles.


Many scopes will have an adjustable objective ring marked with the approximate shooting distances around it to allow you to quickly focus on the target but more importantly, help correct any parallax error that is present at each distance. To go into the effects and corrections of parallax error here would take up far too much space but it will be well worth your time to read some of the excellent articles on this subject


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Whichever type of scope you go for, the main thing to make sure of is that it will physically focus down to 10m otherwise there will be an awful lot of GR competitions that you will not be able to take part in as all you will see is a blur when you bring the rifle up into the aim. Quite a few of the models in the Leupold range for example will not focus down to less than 25m as they as primarily longer range hunting scopes so it’s always best to check before you buy.


Target Turrets


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