This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE HANDLOADING BENCH 6mm NORMA BENCH REST (Conclusion) by Laurie Holland


GameKing HP / 30.5 + 31.0gn IMR-4895). When I note that the top loads were ‘warm’, this means that primer ‘cratering’ was just appearing. Remember though that my unmodified Remy 700 bolt head / firing pin is prone to producing this before reaching full pressures and the Remington BR primer cup is noticeably softer than those of the CCI-450 and BR4. Remember also, that a short-throated chamber optimised for varmint bullets will produce greater pressures from any given load combination than my longer-freebore ‘Norma’ version.


IMPORTANT NOTICE One of my Diggle test targets


Where shown, MVs are for the maximum charge- weight used unless advised otherwise. Talking charge increments, most batches cover a 2.0gn weight range which rose in 0.5gn steps, all combinations consisting of five by 5-round batches. If a load listed in the results table has a greater than 2gn spread, the first increment was a full grain, reverting to half-grain after that. If less than a full 2gn, it will have started as 0.5gn and reduced to 0.4 and 0.3gn steps subsequently. QuickLOAD was used to predict pressures and MVs in advance and some leeway was deliberately built into my charge-weight ranges to avoid overloads.


Remington 7½BR primers were used throughout except for a few combinations with the CCI-BR4 model, this shown in the ‘Comments’ column. No loads produced really heavy pressures in my barrel and chamber with one possible exception (85gn Sierra


41


These components and loads performed safely in the author’s rifle: this cannot be guaranteed for other firearms. Good handloading procedures should be used working loads up from low starting levels while looking for signs of excessive pressure. This data only applies to rifles chambered in 6mm Norma BR form. 6mm Remington BR with a shorter throat will generate much higher pressures.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92