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Choosing & using sights by Gwyn Roberts


this will make it easier for them to see which area of the target they are actually pointing at when initially bringing the rifle up into the aim. Trying to shoot quickly and accurately at 10 metres using a scope that has a limited lower range of between 6 & 8x will usually prove very difficult for most (especially in some of the faster shooting matches) as the target size is obviously magnified a fair amount which will fill the scope up completely and this can often lead to confusion and rushed shots unless the sights are brought directly up onto the centre of the target.


Reticles can be confusing...


every GR shooter but unfortunately the majority of affordable scopes (for most people) tend to be in the region of 1-5x, 3-9x, 3-12x, 4-12x, 4-16x, 5-20 x, 6.5- 20, 6-24x or even 8-32x power.


Most new shooters coming into Gallery Rifle competitions are usually steered by their clubs towards some of the lower round-count events,


Faster - and probably more importantly, consistent - presentation of the crosshairs onto the central scoring zone can be achieved through body alignment, muscle memory and target/sight presentation practices using a lower power setting to start with. This will obviously require a fair bit of time and effort on your behalf in order to get it right but once this skill has been mastered, it will definitely help you to improve your scores and overall performances and is well worth persevering with.


like the 25m Precision, the Multi Target or Timed & Precision 1 matches to start with. Whilst the Precision match allows you plenty of time to complete each stage, the latter two will require you to pick up the targets pretty quickly and fire off one or two rounds within 2 to 3 seconds at the closer distances.


For these matches most newcomers will usually experience greater success by using a scope with a minimum magnification range of between 3 – 5x as


47


As well as making sure that the lowest power setting on your scope is suitable for your intended needs, you must equally ensure that it will provide you with enough magnification at the opposite end to enable you to see where your shots are actually landing on the target. This is especially important when shooting up to 50m where such things as wind, lighting conditions or even an accidentally knocked scope can change the point of impact by quite a margin, especially on the much smaller 22 targets.


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