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Choosing & using sights by Gwyn Roberts


I always check to see where my first few rounds are going when I’m shooting at the longer distances just to make sure that I’m hitting in or around the X or 10- ring. If I’m not, then at least I’m able to see just how far off I need to aim, or simply dial-in the required offset using the turret adjustments. There’s no point in putting 24 rounds down range during a 1500 Match 3 at 50m only to find out, when you go forwards to score, that the rounds were actually landing down


Spending time practising on the range, trying all of the magnification settings, is the only way to find the optimum settings for each of the distances involved. Once you have found the magnification setting that gives you the best results at a particular distance, make sure that you stick with it and don’t be tempted to use one that you simply prefer - it’s the scores on the target that count and not what you perceive to be the most stable.


Bushnell Elite 6500 inside the 8 or 7 ring - just because you


couldn’t see where your shots were going at the time. Whatever caliber you shoot there is no magic magnification setting to use when shooting at the longer distances as it all boils down to personal preference, experience and ability. Some shooters will only use a magnification of somewhere between 6 and 10x because “the sight doesn’t wobble around as much.” In reality though, their stability remains the same, it just appears to be more stable as the movement on the target is simply less magnified than it would be on a higher setting.


Many of the GB team use between 12 - 20x at this distance with very good results but it is definitely something that you will have to work on over time, in conjunction with improving your trigger-pull of course.


Most of my best results have been achieved using between 20 - 25x at both 25 & 50m but I did experiment with using maximum settings of between 12 & 15x at both the Phoenix and Nationals this year and the results were fairly comparable, although I did have to turn the magnification up to check my point of impact a few times during some of the matches as I couldn’t see where my initial shots were going.


It’s also a good idea to write these figures down on a crib note until you can remember them off by heart to help improve your performance. There will obviously always be exceptions but on the whole something like a 3 – 9x scope just won’t get the job done as many have found out and I would suggest that either a 4 -16x or 5 - 20x scope would fulfill most


shooters’ needs when starting off in the GR precision type


disciplines, as they probably offer you the greatest spread between the lowest and highest magnification settings.


The lowest settings will help you cope at the closest distances in most of the GR disciplines whilst the highest will enable you see where your shots are landing at every distance and, although you may not use these maximum settings to start with, they will always be available once you start to improve and need to use them.


The next thing to look at would be adjusting the scope so that you can aim dead-on in the middle of the X ring at each of the distances involved and this is easily done on a scope that is equipped with a set of target turrets. They are very easy to use and will allow you to wrap a piece of white tape around the outside of the elevation turret to mark your distance settings onto it. This makes everything easier and more precise and will also help save valuable seconds rather than having to aim off each time you bring the rifle up into the aim.


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