This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CRUISE PLANNER


CELEBRITY CRUISES Ship


Celebrity Xpedition Century


Millennium, Infinity, Summit, Constellation


Celebrity Solstice, Equinox, Eclipse, Silhouette, Reflection


Rating Type


Resort Resort


SR Dining Tonnage P / C


4*-Plus Adventure 40.30 Open 2,842 5* 5*


5*-Plus Resort 98/45


40.30 Two 70,000 1750/843 46.60 Two 91,000 2100/999


42.80 Two 122,000 2850/1271


One of the most refined of the mainstream brands, offering more choice for those willing to pay a little more. Standard accommodation is bigger than most, decor is chic and the ambience cosmopolitan. Excellent spas, good entertainment and choice of facilities for children. Dining is good and the alternative restaurants on the Millennium and Solstice-class ships are one of their strongest features. The all-new Solstice vessels (2008-12) enhance the line’s excellent range of facilities and style still further and sparked a recent refit of the Millennium vessels. In the Caribbean year-round; Mexico, Panama, Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand and South America in winter; New England and Canada in the autumn; and summering in the Med and Northern Europe, Alaska and Bermuda. The small-scale Xpedition operates exclusively to the Galapagos year-round. Gratuities not included. www.celebritycruises.com/co.uk


COMPAGNIE DU PONANT Ship


Le Diamant Le Ponant Le Levant


Rating Type 5*


Le Boreal, L’Austral 6* Boutique


5*-Plus Boutique 5*-Plus Boutique Boutique


COSTA CRUISES Ship


Costa Allegra Costa Classica


Rating Type 3*


SR Classic 4*-Plus Resort


Costa neoRomantica 4*-Plus Resort Costa Victoria Costa Voyager


Costa Atlantica, Mediterranea


Costa Concordia, Serena, Pacifica, Favolosa, Fascinosa


Costa Luminosa, Deliziosa


SR Dining Tonnage P / C


36.64 Open 8,282 22.22 Open 1,489 38.88 Open 3,500


226/140 67/30 90/50


47.76 Open 10,700 224/139


This French line features an increasingly varied fleet offering a wide range of cruise experiences, all with a distinctly upmarket flavour. Original sail-cruiser Le Ponant created a niche style in small-scale, deluxe sailing in the Caribbean and Med, with high- quality cuisine and a wonderfully laid-back onboard ambience, with few amenities but fabulous service. The addition of Le Levant (1999) created a new style, a sleek adventurer in boutique fashion, while ‘old-timer’ Le Diamant (formerly the chic Song of Flower of Radisson Seven Seas) adds a more traditional feel. The line took another step up in 2010 and 11 with Le Boreal and L’Austral, featuring a more expansive style, more onboard choice, more luxury but the same distinguished service and cuisine. Enhancements include a state-of-the-art Spa, salon and fitness facility. Gratuities not included. http://en.ponant.com


Costa Fortuna, Magica 5* 5*


4*-Plus Resort 4*-Plus Classic 5*


Resort


Resort Resort


5*-Plus Resort


Dining Tonnage P / C


36.47 Two 28,597 784/466 40.64 Two 52,926 1302/590 39.47 Two 53,049 1344/596 38.98 Two 75,166 1928/790 33.49 Two 25,000 836/360 40.50 Two 85,619 2114/897


37.77 Two 102,587 2716/1027 38.11 Two 114,500 3004/1100


41.01 Two 92,700 2260/900


The most recent vessels – Atlantica (2000) to Fascinosa (2012) – give Costa real state-of-the-art, Resort-style ships. Lively and contemporary, Costa is part of the Carnival family but with a more European flavour (albeit with Carnival styling on the newest ships) and offering great value for all ages. Generally weak alternative dining on older vessels but good alternatives on newer ones. Voyager is the former Olympia Voyager of Royal Olympic Cruises and adds small-scale style to unique year-round Red Sea voyages. The neoRomantica underwent a major refurbishment to add two new half-decks and more onboard facilities, including more bars, a coffee lounge, Spa and nightclub for 2012. Their cruise range includes year-round Mediterranean itineraries, plus northern Europe in summer and Caribbean in winter, plus the Middle East (based on Dubai), New England and Canada, Far East, China, Canaries, South America and the Indian Ocean/ Mauritius. Gratuities not included. www.costacruises.com/co.uk


CLASSIC INTERNATIONAL CRUISES Ship


Arion Athena


Princess Danae Princess Daphne Funchal


Rating Type 3*


3* 3* 3* 3*


SR


Classic Classic Classic Classic Classic


Dining Tonnage P / C 18.40 Two 5,888 320/120


29.24 Two 16,144 552/260 29.10 Two 16,531 568/240 33.05 Two 15,833 479/225 20.30 Two 9,563


471/155


The five older, refurbished Classic liners of this Portuguese company sail for various full-ship UK charters to northern Europe (many from British ports), the Med and Middle East, with longer voyages to Australia and back, plus a winter Far East series from Singapore and Hong Kong on Princess Daphne. Arion also offers a rare Eastern Med programme out of Turkey to Syria, Egypt, Cyprus and Lebanon. All five vessels are genuine old-time world travellers that have been well maintained and feature a more traditional onboard style. Most cabins are surprisingly spacious and there is a decent choice of public rooms, while cuisine and entertainment are tailored to UK tastes. With Portuguese officers, international crew and British tour staff and entertainers, they feature friendly service and a real throwback to the more traditional yesteryear of ocean, and at good value, too. Gratuities not included. http://uk.cic-cruises.com


Winter 2011-12 WORLD OF CRUISING 89


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104