This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
DESTINATION FOCUS


Russia


The Far East’s New Frontier –


museums; ten UNESCO World Heritage sites; fabulous food; beautiful gardens; cutting-edge technology; and more than 600 years of history and culture – welcome to the country that most of the world knows as South Korea but which calls itself the Republic of Korea. Just a few years ago, you wouldn’t have found this on the cruise map, save for a couple of visits on world voyages but, in 2012, 12 lines will all pay calls, including Costa and Royal Caribbean with ships in the region year-round and new Harmony Cruises starting next year (see Who Goes There). It is an astonishing proliferation, even by the


ever-expanding horizons of the cruise business, but it is easy to see why Korea has captivated the people behind the itineraries of Royal Caribbean and Co, as well as growing numbers of passengers. Just to start with, it has undergone a radical


transformation in the past 50 years, surviving the bitter conflict of the early 1950s to become a modern and dynamic country that is still in touch with its historical roots and traditions.


South Korea M


Simon Veness details why the stopover point between Japan and China is becoming a major destination in its own right


agnificent beaches; superb scenery – including eye-catching waterfalls and breathtaking mountains; film festivals; palaces, temples and


Marked geologically by a wide penin- sula some 600 miles long and 105 miles wide, it features a massive mountain range along its eastern coast, while much of the interior is equally hilly. The weather varies from hot, monsoon sum- mers to cold but dry winters, with the ideal time to visit usually in the autumn (Sep-Nov), with lots of warm sunshine, brilliant blue skies and extensive golden-red foliage. Spring is also no- table for the stunning cherry blossoms, although this is often the busiest time of the year. But it is the principal cities – and ports of call – that have attracted the cruise lines and, with four major destinations, there is a wealth of unique excursions and other experiences on offer. Here’s how the main ports line up.


JEJU The most popular port of call, this stunning volcanic island off the southern tip of the peninsula was recently voted one of the New 7 Wonders of Nature for its amazing scenery, with its central volcano crater a real must-see. Referred to as ‘Korea’s Jewel,’ it features beautiful views in almost every direction as well as the unique Jeongwol Daeboreum Fire


China


P’YONGYANG


Korea Bay


North Korea


SEOUL Incheon


South Korea


Yellow Sea Daegu Seoraksan National Park East Sea


Yeongdeok Gyeongju Busan


Yeosu Jeju


Korea Strait Japan Jejudo Island Who Goes There


As well as Royal Caribbean and Costa Cruises, who have ships in the region year-round, Holland America, Crystal, Princess, Regent Seven Seas, Oceania, Silversea, Azamara, Celebrity and Seabourn all feature Korea. However, start-up line





Harmony Cruises, is a full Korean operation, having purchased the former 750-passenger Costa Marina and refitted it for trips to Korea, Japan, China and Russia from March 2012. These unique cruises can be booked with The Cruise Line on 0800 008 6677.


Winter 2011-12 I WORLD OF CRUISING 41


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104