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WE’RE NOT JUST HAWKER AND BEECHCRAFT PARTS


Figure 4. Some of the aircraft available at AANC


NDT OF COMPOSITES Besides refresher training on the basic methods on conventional metal structures, a major aviation specific training issue is the NDT of composites. These materials and structures are significantly different from metal structures. For example, composites can be made


up of laminate skins that are then bonded to laminated or metal understructure. Several skins can enclose an area that is filled with honeycomb or foam. The laminates are made up of reinforcing fibers of various materials (commonly carbon, aramid, or fiberglass) which are held together by a matrix of typically thermosets or thermoplastic resins. The reinforcing fibers can in turn come in


FACTORY PARTS AND MORE...


Hawker Beechcraft operators know we have one of the largest inventory levels in the world. But now, we’ve expanded our extensive selection to include consumable parts for Gulfstream, Cessna, Bombardier, Piper and more. That means you can forget about multiple orders and get back in the air faster than with any other source.


Whether your fleet requires igniters, filters, tires or batteries, you can count on us to deliver all the consumable parts you need. We’re available 24/7 with same-day domestic shipping and access to over $500 million of competitively-priced parts inventory worldwide. So rest assured, we’ve got you covered.


hawkerbeechcraft.com/parts • 888.727.4344 • +1.316.676.3300


GLOBAL CUSTOMER SUPPORT SupportPLUS™ PARTS & DISTRIBUTION HAWKER BEECHCRAFT SERVICES TECHNICAL SUPPORT & PUBLICATIONS


©2011 HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. HAWKER, BEECHCRAFT, AND SUPPORT PLUS ARE TRADEMARKS OF HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION.


Aviation Maintenance | avmain-mag.com | October / November 2011 33


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