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[ Focus: WorldSkills ]


have to have the highest possible level of workforce skills. He explains: ’Having the best craft-trained young people in the world competing in London will be inspirational for the industry and show what is possible, both in practical craft skills and in the application of technical ability. It is also an opportunity to show young people, and industrialists alike, the true economic benefits that investment in skills can make for future prosperity.’


Success After triumphant success resulting in a haul of gold and bronze medals for the UK at the previous event in Canada in 2009, the building services industry has every reason to show its support for the best young hands in the business. Including Electrical Installations, the British team will compete across 37 of the 46 skill areas, including the other building services categories of Plumbing, Refrigeration, and Heating and Ventilation. Thomas adds: ’Being involved in international competition


gives a greater understanding of international working practices and level of skills that are being achieved in other countries. This is then useful when planning future training programmes and identifying areas that electrical contractors will need to focus on in the future.’ Young is very proud to represent his country. He says:


’It’s a huge honour to have been selected to represent the UK at WorldSkills. I hope this opportunity will allow me to showcase how apprenticeships can lead to successful employment and career opportunities. I want to improve my skills to be the very best I can for the competition.’


Backing Last month, skills minister John Hayes offered his support and congratulations to the UK team, saying: ‘Those representing the UK at WorldSkills will play a hugely important role in bringing the value of vocational skills and practical learning to national attention. To support the ambitions of young people everywhere in our country, we have created a record number of apprenticeships, and we are building the best skills training system we’ve ever had.” In July, His Royal Highness the Duke of York hosted


a special ceremony at Buckingham Palace for the 43 competitors that make up the WorldSkills Team UK. Young says: ’I was very proud to attend the reception at Buckingham Palace with my training manager David Thomas and my boss Mike Rogers.’ Over the four days, 150,000 visitors are expected to


take in the events at London’s ExCeL centre. All kinds of other talent will also be on display, from areas like mobile robotics, stone masonry and aircraft maintenance, to creative industries like hairdressing, graphic design and floristry – and the full range of construction and building services trades. For those working in the electrical contracting


industry, or indeed anyone with a skill or an interest in vocational training, WorldSkills offers a great educational opportunity to see first hand the kind of skills that shape the world.


n Find out all about the event, or register for complimentary tickets at worldskillslondon2011.com


For more information


Tel: +44 (0) 20 3166 5002 www.fi a.uk.com


September 2011 ECA Today 55


CAN YOU HEAR ME??? Everything you need to


know about voice alarms


One day course – design, installation, maintenance competency


• EN54 and BS 5839-8 compliance • Difference between voice alarm and PAs • Audibility and clarity • Fault fi nding • Amplifi er power and battery calculations • Interface between VACIE and FACIE


• AND MUCH MORE!


Training by professionals for professionals


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