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WHAT MAKES A TND?
This list, taken from a document created for rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina, encompasses the 13 principles of a traditional neighborhood development (TND).


1. The neighborhood has a discernible center. This is often a square or green, and sometimes a busy or memorable street intersection. A transit stop would be located at this center.


2. Most of the dwellings are within a five-minute walk of the center. This distance averages 1/4 of a mile.


3. There are a variety of dwelling types within the neighborhood. These usually take the form of houses, row houses, and apartments such that younger and older people, singles and families, the poor and the wealthy, may find places to live.


4. There are shops and offices at the edge of the neighborhood. The shops should be sufficiently varied to supply the weekly needs of a household. A convenience store is the most important among them.


5. A small ancillary building is permitted within the backyard of each house. It may be used as a rental unit or as a place to work.


6. There is an elementary school close enough that most children can walk from their dwelling. This distance should not be more than 1/8 of a mile.


7. There are small playgrounds quite near every dwelling. This distance should not be more than 1/8 of a mile.


8. The streets within the neighborhood are a connected network. This provides a variety of itineraries and disperses traffic congestion.


9. The streets are relatively narrow and shaded by rows of trees. This slows down the traffic, creating an environment for the pedestrian and the bicycle.


10. Buildings at the neighborhood center are placed close to the street. This creates a strong sense of place.


11. Parking lots and garage doors rarely enfront the streets. Parking is relegated to the rear of buildings, usually accessed by alleys.


12. Certain prominent sites are reserved for civic buildings. Buildings for meeting, education, religion, or culture are located at the termination of street vistas or at the neighborhood center.


13. The neighborhood is organized to be self-governing. A formal association debates and decides on matters of maintenance, security, and physical change.


Source: Diane Dorney, Mississippi Renewal Forum


06.2011
57

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