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28 San Diego Uptown News | Apr. 1–14, 2011 FROM PAGE 14


COSMO


chips. On the dressier side, mus- sels and clams are steamed with bold seasonings of spicy linguica sausage and preserved lemon, and served with a salsa verde. There also are fried fish tacos garnished convincingly with cabbage, salsa fresca and white sauce, just as they are at some of the stands near the Ensenada fish market. Besides the pollo asada and carne asada mentioned ear- lier, the menu offers a full plate of carnitas, here interpreted as pork slowly braised with orange and chilies. The plate is finished Baja-style with plenty of garnish- es, and everything is served in abundance. It would be unthink- able for an Old Town restaurant


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not to offer a burger, and the Meyer Ranch patty served here is dressed with Cheddar and grilled onions and sided with a mound of herbed fries. Desserts include elegant indul- gences, such as chocolate soufflé and warm, individual-sized apple tarts, but the choice that echoes the neighborhood’s flavor most closely is the plate of churros, fried crisp, coated with cinnamon and sugar and served with a cup of melted Mexican chocolate for the ultimate in dunking.u


FROM PAGE 25 FIDDLER


fectingly interpret and sing the eldest two girls. Their “Match- maker, Matchmaker” number is lively, and Chava’s farewell to Anatevka and Tevye, “Far from the Home I Love,” is a dramatic and musical highlight of the production.


Also played and sung well Visit us online at: www.sduptownnews.com


are roles of the girls’ suitors: Motel the humble tailor, by Tom Andrew; Perchik, the radical student from Kiev, by Christopher Johnstone; and Fyedja, the Russian gentile by Brent Burbank. Johnstone nearly steals the show with his vocalism in “Now I Have Everything.”


Playing leading roles are


Susan E.V. Boland as Yente, the Matchmaker, and Joel Gossett as butcher Lazar Wolf. The company acquits itself admirably in singing and dancing ensembles, with the major disappointment being the under-pitch singing of “Sunrise, Sunset,” which is not in the least their fault. Ultimately, the musical, based on stories by Sholom Aleichem, is about pogroms that displaced thousands of Jews during the period leading up to the Russian Revolution. The village of Anatevka is fictional, but what happened to its displaced citizens is not. Some went to Eastern Europe and Israel and others came to the States. Many never saw beloved family members again. Therefore, despite the joy it brings to music lovers, “Fiddler on the Roof” is about a way of life that was ending. The Fiddler may follow Tevye and Golde and their younger daughters at the end of the show, but nothing will ever be the same again. Remaining performances of “Fiddler on the Roof” are Fri.– Sat., Apr. 1-2, and 2:30 pm Sun., Apr. 3, at Birch North Park Theatre, 2891 University Ave., North Park. Visit: lyricoper- asandiego.org, or call (619) 239-8836.u


FROM PAGE 27 SYMPHONY speed. The work gets its title, “Con-


jurer,” from the fact that the soloist doesn’t so much as introduce mate- rial as conjure it, as if by magic. The Jacobs Masterwork Series will also, in May, feature the rarely heard Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 3, featuring 23-year-old Chi- nese pianist Yuja Wang making her San Diego debut—an auspi- cious one indeed. After hearing her extraordinary performance of the dastardly difficult Proko- fiev No. 2 Concerto with the LA Philharmonic two years ago at Walt Disney Hall, I was smitten by Wang’s amazing prowess. Charles Dutoit, conductor emeritus of the Montreal Symphony was guest conductor, and it seems the Canadians have introduced her to North America.


She made her debut with Pin- chas Zukerman and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa; Dutoit became her mentor, and the Canadian press gushed, “A star is born.” Every bit as good as her more famous countryman Lang Lang, best known for the opening ceremonies of the Beijing Olym-


pics and three sold-out concerts in January in San Diego, Wang is refreshingly shy and unassuming. After hearing her several times with the San Francisco Symphony, the San Francisco Chronicle’s Joshua Kosman said, “The only problem with the tre- mendous artistry of Yuja Wang is figuring out how to get enough of it. One concerto’s worth of her dazzling keyboard technique and crisp interpretive personality only whets a listener’s appetite for more.” I couldn’t agree with him more.


A graduate of Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, Wang has appeared with all the major orchestras worldwide: Amsterdam, Madrid, Tokyo, Munich, Milan, Valencia, Zurich, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and of course Shanghai and Beijing, to name just a few. Wang’s embrace of all three of


the Prokofiev concerti as well as the three by Rachmaninoff indi- cates that this is a performer who never takes the easy way out. Just days after her San Diego concerts, she will play the same concerto with the Berlin Staatskapelle. Don’t miss this amazing talent. For tickets and information, call (619) 235-0804, or visit: www. sandiegosymphony.com.u


Composer John Corigliano


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