This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Careful demolition techniques extend the life of a row home.
> Project Name: More Green In Less Space, Doylestown, Pa.
> Builder: Dave Closterman, DCI Enterprises
> Architect: Blupath Design Architects
> Photos: Sam Oberter Photography


As many green experts will point out, the greenest home is an existing home that has been “saved” and turned into a high-performance unit. That was the case with this 1890s two-story row house outside Philadelphia.


The owners loved their home where they have lived for the past 35 years, and which is within walking and biking distance of work.


They wanted to update the house to reflect their Quaker values: unpretentious, earth friendly, and functional.


The modest addition they settled on added a spare 320 square feet. Attached to the kitchen, it incorporates a bedroom/study with storage, an accessible bathroom, laundry, and an entry from the urban garden.


The main part of the house was air sealed and insulated with spray foam in the basement and cellulose in the above-grade walls and roof. The team also replaced the older furnace with a 95% efficient unit.


According to David Closterman, builder and owner of DCI Enterprises, the project was unique from a reuse standpoint. “We focused on demolition, seeing if there were any usable materials. For example, we used the old roof sheathing and roofing for a temporary access path,” he notes.


The owners had salvaged brick for years in anticipation of the project. “A couple of times, I had to say to them, ‘Are you sure you want to reuse that?’” Closterman jokes. The team used floor joists to make trellises for the windows, reused pine flooring, and reused lumber for braces and batter boards. This frugal sensibility is part of the reason the project stayed within its budget.


“From a design standpoint, it was great to have engaged in reuse,” says Paul Thompson, a project architect. “We had to make it as much like a ship as possible so functionally it works great—but it doesn’t have a spare square foot of fat.”


 


ARXX PRIME ARXX
Prime ICFs are designed for a wide range of projects. The patented exposed web is the only one of its kind and provides solid to solid fastening making it easy to attach interior and exterior finishes. Features include a patented exposed web, preassembled forms, and 6”, 8”, and 10” core options, making the product ideal for a wide range of projects. www.arxx.com


SOLATUBE DAYLIGHTING
Solatube provides as much light as you would expect from a skylight many times its size. It also costs considerably less than other daylighting options, such as skylights. The compact and flexible design of the units allow them to be installed in just about any room, including rooms without direct roof access. www.solatube.com


28
GreenBuilder 12.2010

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76