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The Evergreen is also miserly with water. The roof is fully guttered for rainwater harvesting and the landscape is planted with drought tolerant plants and a zoned drip irrigation system, which includes a leak detection device, essential—but often missing--for residential irrigation. The home’s conditioned space is about 3,000 square feet, smaller than many homes in the area. But instead of adding more conditioned space to the footprint, the builder designed outdoor space on the lower level that feels like living space—a permanent lanai equipped with retractable screens. The builder also tried to use as much as possible from the previous house, including cutting up the old slab and making it into pavers for the new driveway, salvaging cement blocks, and preserving existing trees. “Those large trees are all original,” he notes. “To protect them, we kept the original driveway layout. Everything else we planted was Florida native.” The design payoff for this home is obvious—it provides exactly the living environment the client wanted. But what about the energy payoff ? “If you look at the utilities, you see the results,” says Kean. “For a typical home of this size, people may pay $600 a month. But here the average bill is $150, and that includes a large flat fee, trash pickup, and all utilities.”


A central wall that runs through the home was protected with veneer made from crushed stone. Baths include dual-flush toilets, and water-saving showerheads and faucets. The second floor patio (above) includes areas for year-round plants.


 


DALTILE “OUTSTAND” TILES
Having made a commitment to green building, Dal-Tile is touting its tiles with “Outstand Technology.” These porcelain tiles include 60% recycled content—both pre and post consumer. Suede gray speckle is shown. www.daltile.com


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS
> For a complete product list of this project, scan the bar code below. Or go to www.greenbuildermag.com and click on the Green Products tab.


22
GreenBuilder 12.2010

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