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EXPERT TIP | TECHNIQUE | FOOD | CAMPCRAFT | GEAR | Know How


LEARN FROM THE PROS «» CANOEROOTSMAG.COM


Box 1 » BASICS #2 to #6 Single Hooks: For live bait.


Split Shot Sinkers: Crimp onto the line six inches above hook.


Leadhead Jigs: These are coloured weighted hooks. Use 1/8 to 3/8 ounce.


Soft Plastic Grubs: Thread them onto jigs to troll, cast or jig.


Snap Swivels: The swivel minimizes line twist when casting or trolling.


Leaders:Wire or fluorocarbon leaders stop toothy fish from biting through line.


Box 2 » FLASH Spinners: A rotating blade spins around a weighted body for plenty of flash. Try size 0 to 2.


Spoons: Few fish can resist the wiggle of a cast or trolled 1/8- to 1/2-ounce bright spoon.


Box 3 » PROFILE and SPLASH


Crankbaits: Diving body baits look and move like minnows. They cast and troll well without twisting line.


Top Water Plugs: Simulate a wounded minnow or frog with the splash and gurgle of floating surface lures. Great for bass and pike.


IN THE SIDE COMPARTMENTS…


Floats: To suspend bait or soft plastic off the bottom—great for relaxed fishing in front of campsites.


Spare Main Line: 250 yards of no-stretch super line in 10- to 20-pound test.


Leader Line: Fluorocarbon or monofilament leader material in 6- to 12-pound test.


IN THE LARGER FRONT COMPARTMENTS… Hook Hone: Keep hooks sharp.


Lanyard with Nail Clipper and Forceps: Hang around your neck for easy access when rigging lines or removing hooks from fish.


[ expert tip ] Tripper’s Tackle Kit EVERYTHING YOU NEED SHOULD BE IN THE BAG


Plastic tackle boxes with telescoping shelves have their place, but it’s not on a canoe trip. The boxes break and they don’t do a good job of keeping your gear from getting tangled. Instead, use rugged nylon tackle bags (available wherever you buy your fishing gear) to hold individual flat tray boxes full of your most reliable lures. HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD HAVE IN YOUR BAG.


Needle Nose Pliers with Side Cutter: Pliers will bend straightened hooks and side cutter will help remove a hook from fishing partner.


Polarized Sunglasses: Cut surface glare for better sub-surface visibility.


Scale and Tape Measure: Estimating is your right, but accuracy is important where there are size or weight regulations.


Jaw Spreaders: Keep the mouth of toothy fish open wide. Easier on the fish, and the angler.


Cotton Glove: Improves grip and reduces harm to fish when wet.


Filet Knife: If you feel lucky. » JAMES SMEDLEY www.canoerootsmag.com 19


PHOTO: JAMES SMEDLEY


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