search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LABORATORY INFORMATICS


A digital journey


SOPHIA KTORI TAKES A LOOK AT THE ROLE SOFTWARE COMPANIES PLAY IN DRIVING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE LABORATORY


Determining the best approach to a digital transformation effort can be a confusing and complex task


for most organisations, suggests Dave Dorsett, principal software architect at information technology consultancy, Astrix. ‘No single approach exists to transport you from a current state of paper processes, siloed technologies and inconsistent data sets to the digitally transformed laboratory of the future. The reality is the digitisation journey will be different for everyone, based upon the unique set of circumstances surrounding your business.’ However, three pillars build the foundation for all successful digital transformation initiatives: people, process and technology. Think of the example of a three-legged


stool, he continues. All three legs must be present and solid for the stool to provide


26 Scientific Computing World Summer 2021


support and its intended function for long-term use. ‘The most important ‘leg’ (or pillar) for the support and sustainability of your digital transformation strategy is people. Having the right leadership in place is absolutely critical to providing a culture of innovation to foster the dramatic change that will take place in your organisation. The people within your organisation are essential not only to carrying out the effort itself, but also must embrace the changes that will continue to drive your digital transformation strategy. The second pillar, process, is the biggest single tool necessary for digital transformation. Achieving practical process analysis to support digital transformation means keeping your eye on the goal, not on the process itself, Dorsett maintains. ‘Basic operational process improvement opportunities are


likely to be found across the organisation, and include the elimination of the manual entry of data and automating what people are doing repeatedly. Before embarking down the path to directly eliminate these practices, take the time to determine what people are doing before and after. The key to creating a truly transformative environment is to develop a roadmap of your ‘as is’ and ‘to be’ future-state scientific processes, then mapping out the data from end to end.’ The third and final pillar of a successful digital transformation strategy is technology. Perhaps one of the most commonly misunderstood elements of digital transformation programs is the tendency to focus on the operational systems within the laboratory: LIMS, ELN, CDS and SDMS, to name a few. ‘The goal is to address the data created


@scwmagazine | www.scientific-computing.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42