search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ISC goes digital


HERE WE PRESENT SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF THIS YEAR’S ISC HIGH PERFORMANCE CONFERENCE


Quantum computing opens up new possibilities for research. Matthias Troyer, distinguished


scientist at Microsoft and keynote speaker at ISC high performance conference, discusses his research into quantum computing and the development of quantum hardware and algorithms for scientists. Troyer is a Fellow of the American


Physical Society, vice president of the Aspen Center for Physics, a recipient of the Rahman Prize for Computational Physics of the American Physical Society for ‘pioneering numerical work in many seemingly intractable areas of quantum many-body physics, providing efficient sophisticated computer codes


www.scientific-computing.com | @scwmagazine


to the community’, and a recipient of the Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics. He works on a variety of topics in quantum computing, from the simulation of materials and quantum devices to quantum software, algorithms and applications of future quantum computers. His broader research interests span from high- performance computing and quantum computing, to the simulations of quantum devices and island ecosystems.


How will the first quantum hardware solutions be implemented for scientists? The first quantum hardware will be an accelerator. It will not replace classical computers, it will be an accelerator like GPUs, but they will be disruptively powerful for some applications. So it will be a special-purpose accelerator for certain problems. For most users you need to solve problems, like on classical HPC machines. Most people don’t write the kernel for GPUs, they use libraries and application packages built using accelerators. Those people will just have to know where quantum will be useful, and


how to call the library that then uses the quantum hardware. But then there are those people who


write those libraries, who write the algorithms for quantum hardware. They will have to understand more deeply how to use quantum computing to accelerate their calculations. And finally, there will be the people who build the hardware. They will most likely be electrical engineers and fabrication engineers with more knowledge of what is needed to get the quantum hardware to run and operate. First, we develop the programming


tools, the programming languages, like Q#, the compilers, the libraries and so on, so that people can start to learn about quantum computing and the principles, and then start to invent the quantum algorithms. Then they can run them on simulators (classical computing systems that simulate qubits). That way they can test the quantum algorithms, debug them, profile them, optimise them and find the resources required to use a certain application to scale in the future. Will it need a hundred qubits, 1,000 qubits or


Summer 2021 Scientific Computing World 19


fizkes/Shutterstock


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42