search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING


ISC Show report


ROBERT ROE REPORTS ON DEVELOPMENTS IN AI THAT ARE HELPING TO SHAPE THE FUTURE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY AT THE INTERNATIONAL SUPERCOMPUTING CONFERENCE


In 2018 the focus of the Intentational Supercomputing Conference (ISC) has shifted from


big data analytics towards AI and machine learning, which are now beginning to shape HPC technology development. Now in its 33rd year, the ISC High


Performance conference and exhibition, held in Frankfurt, Germany, set a new attendance record by attracting 3,500 people and 162 companies and research organisations from 59 countries to the event. HPC users and vendors came together over five days to exchange ideas and display new products. The convergence of digital modelling and simulation, machine learning and AI, data analytics, and exascale computing, is driving a new generation of HPC. The 2018 conference touched on


these themes in many sessions, talks and


even throughout the exhibition, as new products and services spring up around the continued development of AI in HPC.


25th anniversary of the Top500 ISC also hosted the latest release of the Top500, a biannual list of the fastest supercomputers. This year marked the 25th anniversary of the Top500. This was noteworthy as it was the first time in more than six years that a US supercomputer featured at the top of the list. In 2018 HPC is now feeling the effects of AI development across the spectrum of HPC hardware, as new supercomputers adapt to take advantage of AI and ML workflows. ‘The new Top500 list clearly shows that GPUs are the path forward for supercomputing in an era when Moore’s Law has ended,’ said Ian Buck, vice president and general manager of accelerated computing at Nvidia. ‘With the invention of our Volta Tensor Core GPU, we can now combine simulation with the power of AI to advance science, find cures for disease and develop new forms of energy. These new AI supercomputers will redefine the future of computing.’ The new leader in the LINPACK benchmark is the Department of Energy (DOE) supercomputer from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Summit. The


impact of AI can be felt even here, as the new system comes equipped with more than 27,000 GPU – six for every two Power 9 processors – linked through Mellanox EDR InfiniBand interconnect. Summit has been heralded as the first supercomputer built around AI and will be used in a number of projects that will use AI and ML techniques to investigate grand scientific challenges, such as cancer. Jack Dongarra, professor at the


University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who co-authors the TOP500 list, said: ‘This year’s Top500 list represents a clear shift toward systems that support both HPC and AI computing. Accelerators, such as GPUs, are critical to deliver this capability at the performance and efficiency targets demanded by the supercomputing community.’ When the ORNL launched the Summit supercomputer, Jeff Nichols, ORNL associate laboratory director for computing and computational sciences


 The winning team from Tsinghua University 10 Scientific Computing World August/September 2018


“Summit’s AI-optimised hardware also gives researchers an incredible platform for analysing massive datasets and creating intelligent software to accelerate the pace of discovery”


@scwmagazine | www.scientific-computing.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36