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Business


International Exhibition for Fine and Speciality Chemicals


34th


Advances in gene editing also may drive CAR-T-cell therapy forward, as witnessed by the work of Cellectis. Its off-the-shelf CAR-T-cell therapy candi- date (UCART123) uses gene edited CAR-T-cells as therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, a rare blood cancer. Though T-cell-based therapy can be effective in


some instances, it is associated with risks such as neurotoxicity and cytokine release syndrome. It also has limitations; for instance, a patient already immuno-suppressed from a first-line treatment may not have sufficient T-cells to modify or stimu- late. These drawbacks have spurred investigation into the use of NK (natural killer) cells in novel immunotherapies, since NK cells, unlike T-cells, can recognise and kill cancer cells with a reduced risk of cytokine storm or GvHD (graft versus host disease). Effective NK cell therapy investigation will


require relevant animal models capable of support- ing sufficient NK cell uptake. A study presented at the 2018 Association for Cancer Research Conference demonstrated the utility of humanised mice engrafted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as relevant models for studying human NK cell biology. Investigators compared immune system reconstitution in several models, including an hIL-15 NOG mouse model (a super- immunodeficient mouse that expresses human IL- 15 cytokine) and conventional NOG mice. hIL-15 NOG mice engrafted with human PBMCs demon- strated significantly greater human NK cell recon- stitution as compared to conventional NOG mice and survived for seven weeks post-engraftment without signs of GvHD, providing a suitable study window2. While early studies have demonstrated the poten-


tial efficacy of various cell and gene therapies, safe- ty risks remain a concern. When administering a live drug (in the form of cells) to treat cancer, those cells themselves may have a risk of tumorgenicity; both CAR-T and NK cells are potent in this regard. In an effort to limit tumourgenicity risks, Bellicum Pharmaceuticals has developed a first-of-its kind molecular switch. If a cell-based therapy demon- strates tumorgenicity, this switch can be activated to kill the administered cells. Innovations such as these will help to make cell and gene therapy increasingly viable immunotherapies by addressing known safety risks.


Improving on checkpoint inhibitors Many of the recent advances in immuno-oncology have involved checkpoint inhibitors, including the


Drug Discovery World Spring 2019 26 – 27 June 2019 | Messe Basel, Switzerland Europe’s most renowned industry hotspot


Meet suppliers and experts from around the globe and find bespoke solutions, new approaches and innovative substances for your enterprise.


fine chemicals • pharmaceuticals • adhesives & sealants agrochemicals • paints & coatings • flavours & fragrances household & industrial cleaning • colourants & dyestuffs pulp & paper chemicals • leather & textile • surfactants polymers • plastics additives cosmetics • water treatment food & feed ingredients electronic chemicals petrochemicals and much more


Top conferences and workshops offer valuable insights into ongoing R&D projects!


• Agrochemical Lecture Theatre • Chemspec Careers Clinic • Pharma Lecture Theatre • Regulatory Services Lecture Theatre • RSC Lecture Theatre • Innovative Start-ups


www.chemspeceurope.com Organisers:


Fine and speciality


chemicals for various industries


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