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New Body Cameras for Transport for Wales Staff


Puddle offences reveal millions of motorists are confused by driving laws


Transport for Wales is launching a body camera trial to further improve the safety of their customers and staff. Selected railway staff including conductors and station staff, will be equipped with modern Body Worn Cameras that will help to prevent antisocial behaviour at stations and on trains. Last year alone, saw over 350 reported accounts of physical or verbal abuse against staff on trains in Wales and whilst this is a small number in terms of the overall passenger journeys, TfW are keen to further reduce this number as any incident should not be tolerated. Antisocial figures in Wales show an improving trend in comparison with the rest of the UK and TfW has previously committed to providing CCTV at every station across the Wales and Borders network and already introduced


additional security staff. Tis trial is another step forward in reducing this type of behaviour and is being delivered in partnership with the British Transport Police. Te trial will include four different type of cameras, and aſter a review period, one company will be selected to supplying 300 across the network. BTP Superintendent Andrew Morgan, said: “Te safety of passengers and our rail industry colleagues is our absolute priority and we do everything we can to protect them. We hope the introduction will deter anti- social behaviour and provide reassurance to rail staff as well as passengers. Fortunately, these types of incidents are few and far between, however if anyone has any concerns while travelling, they can text us on 61016.”


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Millions of motorists across the UK commit driving offences they didn’t know existed, according to a new study.


The research, conducted by Confused.com found that nearly one in four (23%) UK drivers – equivalent to nine million – say there are so many motoring offences they don't know what’s legal or illegal. And it’s this lack of knowledge that could land motorists with thousands of pounds worth of fines. More than six million drivers have dodged a fine of as much as £5,000 for driving through a puddle and splashing a pedestrian. One in six (16%) drivers have committed the offence, either accidentally or deliberately, but didn’t receive a fine. The research also proves that not many motorists knew they could be fined for doing so, as nearly one in six (16%) admit they were in the dark about it.


And this isn’t the only offence that might leave motorists confused if they found themselves on the receiving end of a fine.


Offence


Driving through a puddle and


splashing a pedestrian


Eating while driving


Charging a passenger and making a profit


No. of motorists unaware of


No. of motorists Maximum who have


offence the offence committed 6.5 million (16%) 12 million (30%) 8 million (20%)


Flashing another driver to warn them 8 million (21%) of a speed camera


6.5 million (16%) 21 million (50%) 1.6 million (4%) 10 million (24%) £5,000 £100 £2,500 £1,000


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And it’s these sorts of offences that could cost motorists thousands of pounds in fines if they were caught on the spot or taken to court. To prove how much drivers could have faced in fines for these lesser-known offences, Confused. com has launched a driving fines checklist. You select from a list of unknown or uncommon driving offences to calculate just how much you've potentially dodged in fines. Some may feel confused about how their total is so high. To help clear things up, Confused.com has created a guide to explain why some of these offences are illegal, and how drivers can be caught out. Visit www.confused.com/car-insurance/driving-fines-calculator But according to motorists, the sheer number of motoring rules they must obey is baffling. And a further one in five (22%) think some motoring laws are unfair. Although, some drivers are taking the risk in committing offences that carry very clear punishments. More than half (56%) admit to breaking the speed limit. One in 10 (11%) have driven while knowing they’re over the legal alcohol limit. And one in four (25%) have used their mobile phone while driving. It’s no secret that these offences can lead to hefty fines, points on your licence or even a driving ban.


It’s impossible to police every single car on the road. And worryingly, one in four (25%) admit there are some motoring offences they know they are unlikely to get caught doing. But maybe understanding how expensive the repercussions can be is enough to prevent them from breaking the law. This is where Confused. com's driving fines calculator can help. Unless otherwise stated, all figures taken from omnibus research carried out by One Poll on behalf of Confused.com. This was an online poll of 2,000 UK adults who drive (nationally representative sample). The research was conducted between 1st - 4th March 2019.


Published by Hot Press Publications, Mackintosh House, 136 Newport Road, Cardiff. CF24 1DJ. Tel: 029 2030 3900 e-mail: cardiff.advertiser@virgin.net www.cardiffandsouthwalesadvertiser.com


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