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CUTTING THE COST


We will consider requests from device manufacturers for alternative or newly developed equipment to be added on a case by case basis.


WHAT DO I NEED TO CONSIDER BEFORE PURCHASING AND USING EC EQUIPMENT?


‘See and avoid’ is the foundation for Visual Flight Rules flying in the UK. Electronic Conspicuity devices can improve situational awareness for pilots but do not replace the fundamental role of ‘see and avoid’. Pilots using such devices should be aware of their functionality and what they can, and cannot, do. Devices are not always interoperable with each other. This means that users of one type of device


Conspicuity beacons


ADS-B-in devices (certified)


ADS-B in Rx


may or may not be electronically visible to each other, may have different standards of reliability and accuracy, and may use different parts of the radio spectrum for transmitting signals.


The DfT and CAA are not recommending any specific device to pilots but do recommend that all pilots understand and consider the functional benefits, and limitations, of any EC device so they make informed decisions on the level of reliance that can be placed on the information provided to them.


While not a definitive list the table below describes the currently most used EC technologies, a high-level understanding of the interoperability between them and which are certified.


Which traffic receivers can see them?


Airborne Collision


Awareness Systems (ACAS)


ADS-B Out transponder certified GPS


ADS-B out transponder uncertified GPS (Surveillance Integrity Level (SIL) 0)


Power FLARM


Pilot Aware Rosetta (PAW)


Sky Echo 2 (SIL-1 Device) CAA CAP 1391 approved


YES NO*2 YES Variable*4 YES YES


Pilot Aware Rosetta (PAW)


YES YES


Power FLARM


Sky Echo 2 (SIL-1 Device) CAA CAP 1391


YES YES


approved YES


YES


NORTH WEALD FEBRUARY 5, 2020 16:40 GMT We were 4nm to the west of North Weald (our home airfield) inbound from Denham and had notified North Weald Radio that we intended to join left-hand downwind for runway 02 which was acknowledged, we then heard a Cirrus announce they were departing on runway 02 and would be turning left.


NO NO


YES


NO NO


Variable*4


NO NO


NO


YES*1 YES


YES


YES NO


YES


YES*3 NO


YES


*1) Dependent on proximity to ground infrastructure *2) Certified Traffic receivers normally exclude reports from transponders & beacons set to SIL 0 *3) New development requires a FLARM decode licence and a suitable display


*4) Transponders or beacons with a non-certified GPS may not be detected by a certified ADS-B in device. Systems with a quality indicator of System Design Assurance (SDA) ≥ 1 can be ‘’seen’ ’. In the above table, the term certified means a device that has been tested for meeting EUROCAE/RTCA standards and operates in the aviation spectrum.


In parallel to the grant scheme, work will continue on a long-term strategy for Electronic Conspicuity in the UK. Surveillance technology will continue to develop quickly and, together with the DfT, we are open to exploring and


HOW TO APPLY


Applications can be made via our online stakeholder portal (just tap CAA EC into your search engine if you're not already registered) and run until March 31, 2021 (or until the funding is used).


For more more information go to ∙ Airspace Modernisation Strategy ∙ Information on EC devices caa.co.uk/cap1391 ∙ AIC2019Y141: the steps that can be made to enable ‘ADS-B out’ throughout the General Aviation fleet to reflect recent changes and developments from EASA.


embracing new technologies. Applicants should be aware that in common with other technologies in any sector, any device purchased today is not necessarily guaranteed to meet any future EC requirements.


We then had a short conversation with the radio operator requesting to do a few circuits when we got back, which they acknowledged. In the meantime the Cirrus had departed, turned westbound and was now climbing to circuit level as we were about to join at the very base of the downwind leg which put us on a closing course less than 0.5nm away.


Due to the planning in the cockpit for the circuit detail we had taken our eyes off the Cirrus and it was only when we got a Traffic Alert from our electronic conspicuity system that we both located the Cirrus visually and took avoiding action by immediately turning downwind.


The Cirrus would have been flying into a low sun so would have had difficulty seeing us and we would have been momentarily distracted by setting up for circuits creating a potential conflict situation. This is just one occasion when ADS-B has enhanced safety for us.


- Terry Kent


PPL/IRR, 30 years flying experience and 800 plus hours. Aircraft Pipersport.


12


FUTURE VISION


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