search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MARKET REPORT LOW-LEVEL ACCESS


Opportunities within reach


Alan Guthrie visits Snorkel’s impressive Tyneside factory and discovers that the manufacturer is successfully targeting smaller hire operations supplying low-level access products in the UK.


While Snorkel is a famous name in powered access machinery manufacture, it is only comparatively recently that the company has actively sought to raise its profile amongst smaller tool and equipment hire businesses with a range of models for low-level tasks. Now, however, it is developing this market quickly and sees considerable growth potential for hirers serving this market.


Founded in 1959 to manufacture fire-fighting equipment, Snorkel expanded into general powered access machinery through various acquisitions and has itself been the subject of several takeovers in the past. In 2013, the Snorkel business was acquired by US-based Xtreme Manufacturing LLC, whose two main product lines are Xtreme telescopic handlers and Snorkel machines, and it is owned by Don Ahern, who also owns the powered access machinery hirer Ahern Rentals. Operating in more than 90 locations throughout the USA, Ahern Rentals is a general rental company, specialising in high-reach equipment like aerial lifts and forklifts/telescopic handlers, while also offering plant and tools for earthmoving, landscaping and other tasks.


Snorkel’s Vigo Centre factory in Washington, just south of Newcastle- upon-Tyne, produces access machinery for Europe, Middle East, Asia and beyond. It is also the base for Snorkel UK, the distribution


division that sells machines in the UK and Ireland. Snorkel UK was established in 2013; previously the company worked with independent distributors to service this market. The impressive Vigo Centre site incorporates a factory covering 250,000ft2 employs 175 people.


and


Considerable experience In March 2016, Andrew Fishburn was appointed as MD of Snorkel UK. He has considerable experience of the powered access industry, having started as an engineer and having previously held senior management roles with companies such as Instant Zip-Up and JLG, as well as forming manufacturing and supply businesses like Bravi UK and HLS (Height Lift & Shift).


The 3215E slab scissor is designed for indoor and outdoor use.


“I could see the developments that were taking place at Snorkel under its new owners, Xtreme Manufacturing,” Andrew Fishburn told EHN. “Here was an organisation that was prepared to invest in the business and was willing to listen to what customers needed. Being a hirer himself, Don Ahern knows what machine qualities the market requires, which he describes as ‘rental toughness’. Products are designed to meet the rigours of heavy usage and to last many years.


The S3010P is one of three push-around Snorkel mini scissors. The S3010E offers a maximum working height of 5m. 40


“We looked at the strategic opportunities in the market and identified customers who would appreciate the heavy-duty qualities of the machines Snorkel offered, and they can perhaps be best summed up as ‘owner occupiers’: managers of companies with a hands-on attitude who know their customers and have a passion for quality equipment. These include independent tool hirers, as well as specialist access machinery providers and end users. In many ways, the best vehicle for promoting Snorkel UK is our factory,


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52