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interiors


Hatcham College reappoints same window supplier for latest phase


W


HEN The Window Company (Contracts) completed phase one of the window and door


replacement project at Hatcham College, in New Cross, South east London, the school’s Business Manager Mary Williams, was happy to reappoint them for the second and final phase of the impressive CIF (Condition Improvement Fund) funded replacement scheme at the school for 3- 18 year olds in South East London. As previously, The Window Company (Contracts) fitted bespoke timber vertical sliding sash windows on the front elevations of the building to meet the


requirements of the conservation area setting, along with sympathetically styled Veka Matrix arched head vertical sliders and tilt and turn windows with Georgian bars on the rear


Because the Chelmsford based company is entirely independent and works with suppliers fabricating in timber, PVC-U and aluminium, it was able to identify and source products which matched the different elements of the specification, while still representing best value for the school. The Window Company (Contracts) has extensive experience and a growing reputation in the education sector. Its


team are all DBS checked and fully trained to work on school sites and it has the flexibility to be able to deploy fitters at short notice to work during school closure times.


On both phases of the Hatcham College installation, the company was appointed as the principle contractor by Arcadis Consulting, working on behalf of the Haberdasher’s Askes’ School Federation.


www.thewinco.co.uk www.arcadis.com/en/global


Rising pupil exclusions increases need for security and safety measures


A


FTER a period of decline the number of pupils being expelled from mainstream schools is


increasing, placing more pressure on the need for Pupil Referral Units and the security at these premises, which is vital


for managing student and staff safety. ASSA ABLOY High Security & Safety Group offers a range of locks and doors suited to the sensitive needs of Pupil Referral Units and pupils in care. All doorsets in its Secure Education range are independently tested and certified to achieve 60-minute fire resistance integrity and insulation to BS EN 1634 from both sides of the door. In addition, all doors within the offering are tested in line with the Department of Health’s environmental design guide attack test for secure services, as well as meeting with DD171 & BS EN 1192 severe duty performance and strength, and are tested to PAS 24 enhanced security performance requirements. Mike Dunn, Commercial Director for ASSA ABLOY High Security & Safety Group, said: “A recent report by the think tank IPPR, found the total number of


34 educationdab.co.uk


children being taught in ‘alternative provision’ for excluded children is far higher than the total number of reported exclusions. This will inevitably mean increasing pressure on facilities, such as Pupil Referral Units, and the safety of staff and pupils within those buildings. “Pupil Referral Units are first and foremost a place of education and therefore doors and locks must allow for this, grant access, as well as restricting permissions. However, an added level of security and safety must be considered and handled sensitively within these premises. We can advise on and supply doors and locks for every aspect of a secure education environment, mitigating any risk and ensuring a smooth specification process.”


www.assaabloyopeningsolutions.co.uk


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