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COMMENT June 2021 Automation Smarter solutions for industrial efficiency automationmagazine.co.uk June 2021 Automation


Simplified Ethernet connectivity Analog Devices


Simplified Ethernet connectivity with Analog Devices


INDUSTRY FOCUS Automotive / Pharmaceutical


Topics in this issue: Industry 4.0 & Smart Factories Robotics & Motion Control Drives, Controls & Motors Machine Vision


07 24 32


The creativity robots can afford us


Cover supplied by Analog Devices; more on pages 8-10


Automation is a media partner of the following industry organisations:


M


British Automation and Robot Association (BARA) - www.bara.org.uk


UK Industrial Vision Association (UKIVA) - www.ukiva.org


any cite the pandemic for increased use of robots – whether on the factory floor, warehouses or retail space. This has prompted many decision makers to consider the best ways to redesign the layout of their workspace in the most optimum way – say, the routes robotic vehicles take, but also how they are distanced from machine operators for safety. In turn, staff’s tasks can be repurposed from manually interacting with machinery toward directing operations from control rooms.


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There has been a school of thought that robots could displace human workers from their jobs – after all, many tasks can successfully (and fast, and potentially with fewer errors) be handled by robots and cobots, freeing up people from the repetitive and arduous tasks – with “freeing” being the operative word! With many processes offloaded to our non-breathing “colleagues”, human operators can have their roles redefined. Humans can go back to what humans do best – be creative. It doesn’t mean we can all sit on bean bags all day long, calling on the creative muses to descend on our working days, whilst robots frantically whirr and buzz about, finishing off tasks. On the shop floor this could mean people creating personalised products, or in retail, it could mean getting involved in other store operations or in supporting customers. The days of the frequently-encountered lines such as “it’s not my job to do that” or “it’s not in my remit” look numbered. Ro/cobots will most likely redefine our jobs, toward the more creative and finessed touches for products and services. Jobs will most likely become “fluid” – adjusting, changing and evolving with the production needs.


Low cost compact level and pressure sensors





automationmagazine.co.uk Smarter solutions for industrial efficiency


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