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FEATURE Sensors & Sensingy


The HarshIO IP67 I/O distribution box from Molex combines up to eight sensor signals


Instead of individual cable connections to the PROFINET bus of the controller, adjacent sensors and motors are connected to a distribution box at the nodes


Other innovations include the M12 connector range from Molex and M5 connectors from Norcomp, both of which designed for harsh environments, completely waterproof and suitable for extreme temperatures. Heilind also provides solutions such as the Molex Brad HarshIO digital module distribution box for PROFINET, and PC interface and PROFIBUS cards like the Molex SST PB3 in-chassis module for Rockwell Automation CompactLogix control systems. Among further off erings are TE Connectivity’s 98RK-1 scanner interface racks which provide power and communication for up to three external NetScanner system components. In addition, TE 9816 intelligent pressure scanners for rack mounting use a high-performance switch that allows them to communicate with a host computer via an automatic 10/100/1G Base-T Ethernet interface.


Sensors for manufacture monitoring A second example includes sensors in manufacturing processes with restricted space for additional components and


sensor for hydraulic pipes is a further off er from Heilind. U5600 sensors are ideal for measuring liquid or gas pressure, even with diffi cult substances such as contaminated water, steam or slightly corrosive liquids.


TE Connectivity’s CD9515 torque sensor with accuracy of ≤0.5%


where physical wiring is often impossible. For example, if a robotic system is to be monitored, the smallest possible sensors are typically used, with the signals transmitted by RF. The sensors monitor the manufacturing process and log the status of the machines and systems. And, say, if the pressure in a hydraulic line drops, it could indicate leakage. The sensor’s changing values trigger an alarm, informing the operator. This way, the aff ected hydraulic line can be subject to troubleshooting procedures before the system fails.


System monitoring Robust M5 connectors from Norcomp 20 July/August 2020 | Automation


In addition to the extensive TE Connectivity range, also available from Heilind is TE Connectivity’s position sensor for tilt detection - the DOG2 MEMS series with CAN J1939 output. This two-axis inclinometer has a measuring range of ±90°. The TE Connectivity U5600 pressure


TE’s DOG2 MEMS series sensor is a two-axis inclinometer with accuracy of 0.5° (-40 to 85°C)


CONTACT:


Heilind www.heilind.com


Selecting your components As always, industrial automation components and systems must meet various user requirements. To select the best possible components for the application, Heilind has a product marketing team with a high level of technical knowledge. Heilind’s range includes mechanically safe, shielded and sterile components for the food industry, or are specially designed with protection against dust, water and chemicals and suitable for extreme temperatures. Heilind can refer customers many new connector developments, including those based on multi-function interfaces and high signal densities for small layouts. Further innovations include those for high reliability and continuous loads, alongside others with hermetically- sealed and IP68-protected interfaces, or connectors suitable for over 10,000 mating cycles. And, as previously discussed, manufacturers like Molex can provide complete, co-ordinated solution packages to minimise wiring and connection costs.


automationmagazine.co.uk


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