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IN THE FIELD


PHOTOS: Prensa MHCP


RURAL ROADS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT Roads are the most important mode of transport in Nicaragua, providing access to social and administrative facilities and services, especially for the rural population, which makes up around 42 percent of the country’s total. The national road network consists of


approximately 24,000 km of roads, of which only around 17 percent are paved. Over the years, poor maintenance and multiple natural disasters have caused extensive damage. In 2017, the OPEC Fund joined forces with the government of Nicaragua – which has prioritized investments in rural roads – to finance the construction of bridges and to


upgrade two critical road sections in key agricultural areas in the country’s northwest and center. The first road of 22 km is located between the municipalities of Rio Blanco and Bocana de Paiwas, with a total population in the area of around 72,000 people. The second road of 16 km lies between the municipalities of Achuapa and San Juan de Limay, with some 30,000 people living nearby. “Once completed, more than 100,000 people will benefit directly,” said Aguilar. “Transport costs and travel times will be reduced, safety will be improved and employment opportunities will be created.”


of Nicaragua’s GDP and is the primary source of livelihood for


17 percent 90 percent


Agriculture accounts for of the rural population. 21


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