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Herb haven - Grow herbs like rosemary, which is attractive to bumble bees and solitary bees, while other herb garden favourites like lavender, sage, oregano and thyme all attract bees, butterflies and a host of other insects. If you leave some of your herbs to flower, you’ll also be providing a rich food source for these insects, leaving your garden buzzing with life and the hum of activity on warm days.


Tune into birdsong - Bear in mind that birds need four things - something to eat/drink, somewhere to shelter, somewhere to wash and somewhere to breed. Grass, trees, shrubs and water are essential. Hedges, bushes and shrubs are perfect hiding and perching places for birds and provide food like berries, fruit and insects for them to eat.


Thoughtfully placed bird boxes make crucial spots for nesting. Birds of all kinds are reliant on trees for food and shelter, and hanging a few bird feeders from the more sturdy branches creates additional resting places.


Additionally, bird baths provide a watering hole and bathing point for


smaller birds. Your lawn also has lots of different seeds that birds like, such as meadow grass, buttercup and dandelion.


Make a splash - Garden ponds create ideal breeding conditions for frogs, newts, and toads and attract fascinating insects like the skater, water boatman and dragonflies. Enjoy the gentle croak of the amphibians and listen to birds, insects and other animals. Rustle up sounds - After a busy day, the rustling of leaves can create an air of


tranquillity. Tall grasses like miscanthus and greater quaking grass make a lovely rustling sound, even in gentle breezes; as do fine-leaved trees like birch and robinia. Bamboo makes a lovely hollow knocking sound when it bumps together and bigger canes can be turned into wind chimes.


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