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news in brief... Doubts over self-employment review


TEELINE MARKS ITS HALF CENTURY Teeline shorthand reaches its 50th anniversary this year. It was developed by James Hill, who was born in 1908 near Bradford and taught Pitman shorthand. Hill developed Teeline as a quicker and more straightforward method. He taught taster classes in 1966 and two years later it was recommended to the National Council for the Training of Journalists.


PAPER TO LIVE STREAM CITY RACE The Manchester Evening News will live stream this year’s Greater Manchester Run. The move is thought to be a first for a UK regional paper. Viewers will be able to watch the event on April 8 on the MEN’s website after a partnership was set up with race organiser Xtra Mile Events.


T


he Irish government review of self- employment


arrangements and implications for social insurance and tax revenue as a ‘missed opportunity which misses the target and fails to address key issues about labour rights and social protection’, according to Séamus Dooley, NUJ Irish secretary. He said: “The NUJ


represents a significant number of freelances, including workers forced into bogus employment. The report does not recognise the scale of the problem in the media sector. There are a variety of employment relationships in the industry and a longstanding tradition of freelance work, but there is also a serious problem with workers being forced to accept contracts that deny them employment rights and social protection.”


The Irish government started


a consultation process in January into bogus self- employment. Late last year, the Irish Congress of Trade Unions estimated that such arrangements in the construction industry cost the state about €80 million a year in lost tax and social insurance payments since 2007. The government has acknowledged that bogus self-employment arrangements


JOHNSTON LOSS OFFSET BY I PAPER


include advertising and circulation sales, fell six per cent year-on-year in 2017. That figure is a 13 per


J


ohnston Press’s total publishing revenues, which


cent fall if the i paper is excluded. Newspaper


circulation revenue rose two per cent, which the company said was boosted by the i paper’s


Moved house or changed your email address?


‘exceptional’ year. Johnston Press, which has more than 200 titles in the country, bought the i, the cut-price sister paper of The Independent, for £24


million last year. The i newspaper


circulation revenue rose 19 per cent and advertising increased 26 percent in the second half on a like-for-like basis, the


– where a worker is forced to be a sole trader or operate through a company to get work – can result in a significant reduction in social insurance payments. This is because the employer does not have to make an employer’s contribution, and the worker is responsible for their own taxes. At the same time, the worker


can lose out on rights to holiday sick pay and maternity and pension contributions.


publisher said. Johnston Press said digital growth remains its ‘strategic priority’. It said digital revenues, including classified advertising income, were up three per cent (14 per cent excluding classifieds).


Please let us know. You can update your membership


record on the website nuj.org.uk or email membership@nuj.org.uk


4 | theJournalist


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