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After Hours


BEVERAGES


Good For What Ales You To spike subpar suds or lighten up something harder, a beer cocktail is the ultimate mixer


COCKTAILS ARE BACK IN STYLE. And while we’ve always been huge on beer, we’ve become even more interested since the growing ranks of Canadian craſt beers — with their intense flavours — rejuvenated the market. So it’s no surprise that more restau-


rants, brewpubs and home mixologists now combine beer, liquor, herbs, mix, bitters and fruit to make tasty beer cocktails. Beer cocktails deliver when you want some fizz in your drink, prefer a deeper flavour than soda water or clear alcohol,


or want to keep the alcohol content low. “You lighten up your drink if you just mix it with beer,” says Tara Luxmore, a certified cicerone (that’s a beer somme- lier) with Beer Sisters, a beer-focused consulting and event company in Toronto. Drink a beer cocktail for an aſternoon treat or before dinner. Luxmore says ales pair well with food, so you can have your favourite beer cocktail with dinner, too. Heavier beers such as stout can be mixed with chocolate-flavoured liqueurs as an aſter-dinner sweet fix.


A cocktail can also help when the beer at hand isn’t so fabulous. “When I get a beer I don’t like, I’ll try to fix it” by adding ingredients, says Vancouver- based beer writer and blogger Rebecca Whyman. Breweries bottle and can radlers and shandies, which consist of beer mixed with citrus juice or pop. Soon, we might see more ready-to-sip blends: last year, Henderson Brewing in Toronto released Old Fashioned Premium Rye Ale, which combines spiced rye, bitters and citrus to mimic a classic cocktail. For something more adventurous,


play around with a liquor-based cocktail. Luxmore loves beer Caesars: combine Clamato or Walter Craſt Caesar Mix with half a can of pale ale or pilsner. “It’s more refreshing than vodka,” she says. A light beer mixes well with fruit


juice, fresh fruit and vodka for a pitcher of sangria. Or try combining the aperitif Campari with ice and half a bottle of fruit-forward India pale ale. To make your own concoction, Luxmore suggests building the drink slowly to get the ratio right and tasting as you go. “Add it in a little at a time. With beer, a little goes a long way.” — Diane Peters


JANUARY 2018 | CPA MAGAZINE | 55


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