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SKILL


Upselling Is Good for Business WILLIAM F. KENDY


It takes a lot of time and money to develop and keep an account; so, once you have it in the bag, it makes sense to sell as much to that account as you possibly can. By carefully upselling products and services your customers really need and will value, you could double, triple, or even quadruple your business in a year.


While upselling can be a power- ful sales tool, you must follow a few simple rules to make it work. Mark Winthrop, a sales manager for a large signage company, and Sam Edmonds, an account executive for a cable gi- ant, share their thoughts about what works in the world of upselling. “Upselling is largely a matter of selling your company and pushing the quality factors of your product


and customer image,” says Winthrop. “Before you can upsell, you need to develop a relationship with the prospect. We bring prospects into our facility and show them our manpower, what we’re capable of doing, and the quality of our work. We want them to be assured their sign is going to be a piece of jewelry. And, if they need support, we do it from A to Z with such services as one-stop shopping


and on-time delivery.” Winthrop feels the key to selling – especially when trying to upsell a cli- ent – involves continuously qualifying the prospect throughout the buying process. “Qualify, qualify, qualify, and then qualify some more,” advises Win- throp. “As the prospects get closer to making the purchasing decision, their wants and needs are going to change, and salespeople have to recognize and keep on top of those changing needs.” Winthrop also emphasizes the im- portance of image (or perceived im- age) on the part of the customer. “It’s a question of how much money a cus- tomer has to spend and what kind of image the business wants to project,” he says. “It’s like buying a suit. If a guy is comparing a $595 suit with a $1,200 Armani, the question in his mind is whether it’s worth spending another $600 to look like a million bucks. And, if he looks like a million bucks in the more expensive suit, then which tie is he more likely to buy – one that costs $50 or one that costs $90?


SELLING POWER AUGUST 2019 | 9 © 2019 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


VIKTORIA KURPAS / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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