search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Advertising Feature


Explore The Beaches of For W


New trade website unspoiltflorida.com shines a light on uncrowded beaches


ith more than 100 islands, incredible nature and wildlife, and beautiful unspoilt coastline,


The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel is one of Florida’s lesser-known treasures. Located in the southwest of Florida, it’s full of opportunities


for water-based activities, from paddleboarding and fishing to island-hopping and shelling, while its tropical climate means it’s ideal to visit year-round. Kayaking is one of the best ways to get


up close to the wildlife – your clients will share the water with playful dolphins and manatees. It’s also easy to get to at just three hours’ drive from Orlando,


two hours from Fort Lauderdale or Tampa, or a short flight to Fort Myers airport from other US gateways, making it the perfect extension to round off a Florida holiday. There are many distinctive areas that make up this unspoilt treasure; here is just a small selection of some of the most popular.


EXPLORE THE DESTINATION


SANIBEL ISLAND Stretching across 12 miles, Sanibel Island is a great starting point to enjoy the area’s unspoilt landscapes and natural beauty, where there are no traffic lights, no chain restaurants and no building can be higher than the tallest palm tree. Explore the largest mangrove ecosystem in the US; spot alligators, dolphins and pelicans; or collect unusual shells on the shore.


CAPTIVA ISLAND Captiva Island is a relaxing oasis with a Caribbean feel. A handful of resorts line each end of its long beachfront, offering golden sand to stretch out on or to watch hatchling turtles scurrying to the sea. In the evening, stroll to Andy Rossy Lane for dinner or join the sunset celebrations at the Mucky Duck.


BONITA SPRINGS AND ESTERO Bonita Springs and Estero will appeal to clients who are keen to go hiking, cycling or exploring nature parks, such as Everglades Wonder Gardens. There are also miles of untouched beaches on the islands and fascinating indigenous history at Mound Key.


CABBAGE KEY AND USEPPA Stepping onto these small islands is like stepping back in time to the Florida of old, where southern hospitality mixes with a well-heeled yachting crowd. Its charming Florida island restaurant is covered in signed dollar bills – including a few famous names.


CAPE CORAL Cape Coral is a boater’s paradise. There are more than 400 miles of waterways in this unique city, where residents share their space with an assortment of wildlife, including Florida’s largest population of burrowing owls. Suggest clients stay at a waterfront holiday home or rent a boat for a week to explore at their own pace.


FORT MYERS BEACH One of the most popular beaches is on Estero Island, where you’ll find watersports aplenty and buzzing shops and restaurants along Times Square. There’s no better place to kick back and relax than with an alfresco dinner at one of the seafood restaurants along the pier, while watching dolphins play offshore.


FORT MYERS Fort Myers is a must-visit if your clients want to explore the history and culture of the area. Tour the winterholiday homes of Thomas Edison and Henry Ford at Edison and Ford Estates, or get hands-on with the interactive exhibits at the IMAG History and Science Center. And if your clients can’t get enough of the area’s incredible wildlife, Fort Myers boasts a manatee park and the Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve, where over 3,000 acres of wetland are home to an abundance of flora and fauna. After a full day of sightseeing in Fort Myers, relax at one of the downtown restaurants or bars lining the Caloosahatchee River.


unspoiltflorida.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40