search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Habemus new GEIR President!


After several years at the head of GEIR, the European Waste Oil Re-refining Industry sector if UEIL (Independent Union of the European Lubricants industry), Christian Hartmann stepped down from his role as GEIR President to pass the reins to Marco Codognola, CEO of Itelyum.


Marco, an electronics engineering graduate, spent a significant portion of his career in sales, business development and M&A, working for the main players of the energy sector (conventional and renewables). He joined Viscolube in 2012, where he headed the growth and diversification process of the company which resulted in Itelyum Group, now active in regenerated base oil production, solvent and chemical purification, industrial waste management.


His past years involvement in GEIR activities as a Structuring the work


member of the Steering Committee, alongside former GEIR Presidents Detlev Brunhke and Christian Hartmann, coupled with his international and technical experience, made Marco an excellent fit for this leadership position.


As new GEIR President, Marco committed to further the successful work undertaken by his predecessor. In that regard, he is already rolling-up his sleeve so as to contribute to a decisive technical study on waste oils which conclusions will feed in the European Commission’s related feasibility assessment, meant to determine if the EU should establish a waste oil regeneration target. Commissioned by the Joint Research Centre (the scientific body of the European Commission), the study will be conducted by independent contractors over the next six months.


Marco Codognola, President, President, GEIR


Used oil regeneration represents an ecosystem which makes available regenerated base oils, enhancing the sustainability of the lubricant sector. In the next years GEIR will face few challenges and significant opportunities specifically related to the ongoing energy transition and the clear move toward a more sustainable industry. In order to allow members to be more actively involved in GEIR’s activities and to provide their own experience to the benefit of the association, GEIR has been recently reorganised into 4 specific areas: product safefy, technology- environment, sustainability, relationships-regulation. Each area has a lead coordinator plus a support team, appointed by members. A technical secretary will ensure coordination between areas, the President and the Steering Committee.


We notably expect these structural upgrades to facilitate and make our engagement with EU policymakers even more efficient than before. The first test will be with the European Commission’s Joint


24 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.160 DECEMBER 2020


Research Center (JRC) – the European Commission’s scientific body, which kickstarted officially in October its first study on waste oils treatment. The initial data collection exercise was presented to all relevant stakeholders, including GEIR, with a view to ask for their future collaboration. The gathered data and results will notably inform the Commission on the feasibility and need to promote further waste oil regeneration at EU level.


While being much involved with the JRC, GEIR is also closely monitoring the European Parliament’s activities. Its Environment committee is currently drafting a report on Circular Economy which will provide recommendations to the European Commission. Against the JRC study backdrop, reiterated support from the political institution to waste oils regeneration, and especially targets, will be timely.


LINK www.geir-rerefining.org


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56