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Lube-Tech PUBLISHED BY LUBE: THE EUROPEAN LUBRICANTS INDUSTRY MAGAZINE


No.129 page 4


powder is mixed well under agitation with the base oil under conditions and proper dosages enough to provide the maximum thickening efficiency. The thickening is such that milling is recommended to smooth out the lumps and bumps and that gives noodle-like hardened grease in grades 4-6, which we called “noodle” or masterbatch (PUGM).


The choice of the base oil or other components (like the baking soda or yeast) dictates the extent of the maximum thickening efficiency (Table 3) and hence the grease yield of the subsequent oil back to the desired grease grades.


Figure 4: AFM study of EHL contact on entrapped thickeners.


Recognising the extensive thickener interactions is the key in the design of the patent pending powder making process.


In the case of PUGT in the fine powder form, its morphology resembles that of flour (see Figure 5 for an analogue of the powder: flour). In many ways the grease conversion process is similar to the making of dough from the flour and is ideally carried out in a two-stage process (Scheme 1). In stage one the PUGT


The thickener dosage is typically ranged from 15% to 30%. Higher thickener dosage reduces the process time but would make the agitation difficult. Milling is always required in the making of PUG via the in-situ method. In the PUGT process milling is also important for both stages.


Figure 5: Flour ready for the dough making.


Scheme 1: Two-stage conversion from PUGT to PUG: 1) Gelling, and 2) Oil back


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.158 AUGUST 2020


21


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