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BOOK REVIEW


Lubricant Blending and Quality Assurance


Review by Rod Pesch, Technical Director, UKLA


It was most interesting for LUBE Magazine to be asked to review this recently published book written by David Whitby, a well-known figure within the lubricants industry and a one-time author and course leader for the UKLA Certificate of Lubricants Competence (CLC) training programme. Lubricants blending with all the development, complexity, quality and performance issues is not the “bath tub” operation often referred to in industry mythology. In so many applications today lubricants are stipulated as bespoke and intrinsic components within the workings of finely-balanced machinery.


This book commences with a thorough definition of base oil types and characteristics and moves on through an in-depth process for new product


Certificate of


Lubricant Competence 2019


A complete basic lubricant training programme devised and developed by leading industry experts.


Modules include: 1. Exploration & Refining 2. Base Oil Types & Characteristics 3. Basic Tribology 4. Lubricant Additives 5. Industrial Lubricants 6. Automotive Lubricant 7. Greases 8. Metalworking 9. Health, Safety & Environment 10. Certification Session


Attend 9 modules and the final certification session is free.


generation incorporating a review of additive types, properties and their function. Included are generic type formulations for a comprehensive range of lubricant types which all go to emphasise the essential need for segregation within a blending plant to avoid possible cross contamination of products. Even the minutest levels of contamination can lead to disastrous effects on performance. Foaming or poor water separation can so easily occur, as the most common problems but many other performance related failures can result in service. Dedicated lines for the transfer of additives or base oils is essential and even more essential on package filling. Where common lines are unavoidable, operations for line flushing and pigging are highlighted. All blending issues and options are covered in some detail which makes this journal a useful source of reference.


In today’s industry one area of supreme importance is the question of quality assurance and certification against all manner of quality standards and regimes. Warehouse management and Just-in-time sourcing are all covered and endorsed. We are informed of the concept of “Quality Management” versus “Quality Control” and of course ISO 9000 and derivations. All these concepts are explained and emphasised together with the necessity of instituting them all into a lubricant company’s quality philosophy.


Registered Lubricant Professional


For more details visit www.ukla.org.uk/training


It would be wrong to put this volume into the category of a “page turner” but it is thoroughly recommended as a technical reference “must have”, for an industry blender. Any new recruit or job change candidate looking to take a prominent role associated to the lubricants blending function will find this an immensely valuable source of reference material. However, it does go much wider than that insofar that all functionaries within the company will benefit from the occasional consultation.


34 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.149 FEBRUARY 2019


DEVISED


AND DEVELOPED BY INDUSTRY LEADING EXPERTS


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