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HANGAR TALK UNMANNED News relating to unmanned aerial systems


These include: • Integration of a transponder for sense and avoid; • Installation of the Silvus Technologies’ radio; and • Implementation of Lockheed Martin CDL Systems’ VCSi Touch SUAS Ground Control System software that includes access to Swiss maps, including digital terrain elevation data (DTED) and Geofencing.


The first set of optimized systems will be delivered later this year, with the remaining systems to be delivered several months following the first delivery. These Indago 3s will support tactical- level reconnaissance and surveillance to support information collection, search and rescue, disaster relief and battle damage assessment.


Swiss Army Chooses Lockheed Martin’s Indago 3 UAS For Tactical Reconnaissance and Surveillance


Armasuisse recently contracted Lockheed Martin (LMT) for a fleet of Indago 3 small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), with options for spares, training and tech support and additional systems for the Swiss Army.


Indago provides aerial reconnaissance in environments unreachable by normal fixed-wing, unmanned aircraft systems.


The first phase comprises manufacturing development to optimize the Indago 3’s configuration to meet Swiss Army requirements.


“Indago 3 is uniquely qualified to support the Swiss Army’s mission needs,” said Steve Fortson, UAS Portfolio manager at Lockheed Martin. “Indagos operate very quietly from relatively low altitude and provide high-fidelity sensor imagery. They are simple to use and require minimal training so soldiers can quickly execute their mission. The Silvus Technologies radios also deliver best-in-class performance and efficiency in a miniature package. They’re ideal for use in portable and embedded applications where size, weight, power and cost are key.”


Depending on payloads and operating environment, Indago 3 has a flight time of up to 50 minutes, a range of 10 kilometers, a cruise speed of 25 knots and dash at up to 40 knots. It can also operate at temperatures as low as 30-degrees below zero and as high as 120 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s cyber-secure with high-fidelity color and infrared 3-axis stabilized sensors – and at approximately 5 lbs., Indago can be easily transported by a single backpack and deployed in less than three minutes.


and will initially occur at the FAA’s William J. Hughes Technical Center, located adjacent to the Atlantic City International Airport in New Jersey.


After the initial testing and evaluation in New Jersey, the agency expects to expand the effort to four additional U.S. airports.


FAA to Test and Evaluate Unmanned Aircraft Detection & Mitigation Equipment at Airports


The Federal Aviation Administration recently announced that it plans to evaluate technologies and systems that could detect and mitigate potential safety risks posed by unmanned aircraft. The effort will be part of the agency’s Airport Unmanned Aircraft Systems Detection and Mitigation Research Program.


The FAA plans to test and evaluate at least 10 technologies or systems. The evaluations are expected to begin later this year


42 Sept/Oct 2020


Interested manufacturers, vendors, and integrators of drone detection and/or mitigation technologies/systems have until Oct. 5, 2020 to respond to the FAA’s announcement.


Airport operators interested in hosting this test and evaluation effort should respond to the FAA’s solicitation before Oct. 22, 2020.


The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 requires the agency to ensure that technologies used to detect or mitigate potential risks posed by unmanned aircraft do not interfere with safe airport operations.


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