search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Drones


Surprisingly, functional unmanned aircraft have existed for more than 100 years. In the mid-1910s the British RAF was developing radio-controlled unmanned “aerial target” aircraft to take out German zeppelins, proving just how useful unmanned aircraft could be in military deployment, a fact reinforced by the heavy use of surveillance/ attack drones (such as the USAF’s MQ-1 Predator) in the world today.


It is only now that drones are taking off in the commercial sector. Robin Riedel, a partner in the consulting firm McKinsey & Company who covers the disruptive aerospace sector, says three “unlocks” explain why this is happening today. “The first unlock is battery density, or the amount of energy that can be stored in a battery at a given weight,” Riedel says. “We’re now at the point where batteries have sufficient density to provide the power that commercial unmanned aircraft need at weights that they can afford to carry aloft.


“The second unlock is the amount of flight/sensor data and onboard artificial intelligence that we can use in drones to allow them to fly in an autonomous/ self-flying mode and to carry out preprogrammed flight paths with minimal human intervention,” Riedel adds. “The third unlock is the public’s growing acceptance of unmanned aircraft, now that consumers have become accustomed to buying toy drones for their kids at Christmas.”


Other factors that have helped commercial unmanned systems achieve critical mass include the development of helicopter- like multirotor aircraft capable of lifting heavy payloads and the work being done to integrate drones into air traffic control systems, which makes beyond-visual- line-of-sight flights safely possible for unmanned aircraft.


Finally, there’s one more reason that these drones are taking off: their ability to fly missions that are not economically prudent for manned aircraft to fly on their own. “Today’s drones are being offered as turnkey solutions for business,” says Riedel. “Providers are selling flight management software that allows you to choose destinations by just placing markers on your iPad screen.”


60


Mar/Apr 2021


Are


Ascending


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76