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HANGAR TALK Industry news relevant to your business


Global Aerospace Design Corp. Expands its ADS-B Out Solutions with FreeFlight Systems


FRASCA Expands Manufacturing Capacity with Level D FFS Contract Win


FRASCA International Inc recently announced it will be expanding its manufacturing facility in response to strong flight simulator sales, including a contract for a Level D Full Flight Simulator (FFS) for an undisclosed helicopter operator. FRASCA currently operates out of an 85,000-square-foot office and manufacturing facility that includes two additional outbuildings at its manufacturing facility in Urbana, Illinois.


The addition will increase the facility’s size to accommodate manufacturing capacity for two Level D helicopter full-flight simulators with large dome visual systems and roll on/ roll off cockpit configurations. These Level D FFSs are the most advanced level of flight simulator and must meet strict qualification and training requirements. This addition will expand the factory’s number of FFS pads to five, while also increasing FRASCA’s capacity for building full-flight simulators for larger aircraft as demand for these devices increases.


“Adding this manufacturing space is one visible element to our strategic plan to increase our engineering and manufacturing throughput,” stated John Frasca, president of FRASCA International Inc. “Other investments include 3D printing, network infrastructure upgrades, and staffing additions.”


Construction for the building addition will begin this Spring and will be completed in September of 2021. In addition to the building expansion, FRASCA has been able to maintain its entire workforce throughout the Covid-19 pandemic and will continue hiring additional personnel as needed.


30 Mar/Apr 2021


FreeFlight Systems recently announced that Global Aerospace Design Corp. (Global) successfully added three aircraft types to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) ST04299CH for Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out. These recent certifications also include FreeFlight’s 1203C Global Navigation Satellite System as the primary position source.


“FreeFlight Systems works closely with operators to develop systems that will provide the best NextGen to support the needs of the commercial airline industry,” explained Tim Taylor, president and CEO of FreeFlight Systems. “The advantages of this system is that it will allow these aircraft to fly more efficiently, and ultimately improve situational awareness and safety.”


Initially, this STC covered the installation of ADS-B Out utilizing ACSS XS-950 Mode S transponders with Rockwell Collins GLU-920/-925 Multi-Mode receivers as the position source. However, the most recent amendment adds three aircraft types, the Boeing 737-400, Boeing 737-500, and Airbus A310- 300, utilizing the FreeFlight 1203C.


FreeFlight’s 1203C module is specifically designed to provide highly accurate global positioning of an aircraft for airline transport, military, and business aviation platforms. The 1203C is certified to TSO-C145c and meets position source requirements for Required Navigation Performance (RNP) and other L-NAV operations. Its system allows operators to integrate next-gen avionics, and leverage advanced safety and greater fuel efficiencies within its aircraft fleet. “Global proudly continues to expand our ADS-B Solution offerings in support of our customers,” stated Todd Hamblin, president and CEO of Global. “In conjunction with FreeFlight, we are not only happy to cover more aircraft but provide an alternative position source as well.”


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