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USHST


Which U.S. Helicopter Industries Have the Best and the Worst Accident Records?


United States Helicopter Safety Team


The U.S. Helicopter Safety Team (www.USHST.org) looked at 10 years of helicopter operations data from


Jan. 2009 through 2018 and compared the share of flight hours of every industry type with the percentage share of total accidents and fatal accidents. During this period, U.S. civil helicopters flew more than 31 million flight hours and experienced 1,298 total accidents and 209 fatal accidents. Comparing the share of flight hours with the share of accidents within each industry area, the USHST developed these lists showing which industry areas have the best and worst records for total accidents and fatal accidents.


Industry Ranking for Fewest TOTAL Accidents (Ranked by Share of Accidents vs. Share of Flight Hours)


1. Air Ambulance 2. Aerial Observe/Police/News 3. Air Tour/Sightseeing 4. Offshore/Oil 5. Other (positioning, proficiency) 6. Firefighting 7. External Load 8. Business/Corporate 9. Instructional 10. Commercial (air taxi, for hire) 11. Utilities/Construction 12. Aerial Application 13. Personal/Private


Industry Ranking for Fewest FATAL Accidents (Ranked by Share of Accidents vs. Share of Flight Hours)


1. Instructional 2. Aerial Observe/Police/News 3. Air Tour/Sightseeing 4. Other (positioning, proficiency) 5. Offshore/Oil 6. Air Ambulance 7. Firefighting 8. External Load 9. Business/Corporate 10. Commercial (air taxi, for hire) 11. Aerial Application 12. Utilities/Construction 13. Personal/Private


For more details about the data, see the press release on the USHST web site. Since 2013, the U.S. Helicopter Safety Team has focused on enhancing safe operations and reducing fatal accidents within the U.S. civil helicopter community. From 2012 to 2014, the average number of U.S. accidents per year was 146 and the average number of fatal accidents each year was 25. From 2015 to 2017, this has decreased to 118 total accidents per year (down 19%) and 18 fatal accidents per year (down 28%).


rotorcraftpro.com 27


Sunny Aviation, located in Denver, has purchased from entrol an H135 FTD Level


5 simulator. The simulator will be equipped with dual GTN 750, spherical visual with 6-channel projection system, high-resolution database and vibration system.


The FTD will be used for ab Initio training, IR and CPL courses and mission training for H135 operators. It will be certified as FTD Level 5.


Mr David Sungelo, Sunny Aviation´s owner, explains why they have chosen Entrol’s H135 FTD Level 5 simulator: “The extreme realism of the Entrol H135 FTD Level 5 simulator gives pilots more flying time in order to maintain and enhance their proficiency at a much lower cost than a traditional helicopter rental.”


“Our simulator will also include the Garmin based GTN 750 aviation communications suite and a Technisonic TDFM-7300 radio, that allows communication across all aviation and air-to- ground frequency bands.”


“This means both students and commercial pilots will have the ability to practice different scenarios while simultaneously talking to simulated ATC controllers and Emergency Medical Personnel,” David Sungelo concludes. This will be the second Entrol simulator to be installed in the USA.


Entrol Sells its First H135 FTD Level 5 Simulator in the USA


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