search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
(ergonomics), possibly resulting in poor pilot performance/dissatisfaction.”


“Automation may change modes without pilot commands; this can surprise or startle.”


“Pilots may lack confidence in automation due to past experience (or lack of experience) with it. This may result in a failure to use automation when it should be used.”


One comprehensive study on automation issues affecting pilots was coordinated and reported by Funk, Lyall, & Riley in 1995. Their study determined these issues affecting pilots:


Understanding: Pilots may not understand the structure and function of automation or the interaction of automation devices well enough to perform their duties safely.


Situational awareness: The behavior of


automation devices, what they are doing now, and what they will do in the future, based upon pilot input or other factors, may not be apparent to pilots. This may result in reduced pilot awareness of automation behavior and goals.


Complacency:


Pilots may become


complacent because they are overly confident in the FMS and uncritical of automation. Such complacency leads to a failure to exercise appropriate vigilance, sometimes to the extent of abdicating responsibility.


Inappropriate usage: Pilots may use


automation in situations where it should not be used.


Complexity: Automation may be too complex, in that it may consist of many interrelated components and may operate under many different modes.


This makes automation


difficult for pilots to understand and use safely. Surprise events:


Automation may perform


in ways that are unintended, unexpected, and perhaps inexplicable to pilots. This can create confusion, increase pilot workload to compensate, and sometimes lead to unsafe conditions.


Dissemination of information: Important


information that could be displayed by automation is not displayed, thereby limiting the ability of pilots to make safe decisions and take safe actions.


Woof!


Advanced technology can be found in even in the most basic aircraft these days. Stay vigilant and monitor it closely. Maintain situational awareness, and above all, know your systems. If you feel you’re becoming overwhelmed, drop down a notch. Doing so will keep you in the loop and help you to avoid becoming task saturated.


Randy Mains is an author, public speaker, and an AMRM con- sultant who works in the he- licopter industry after a long career of aviation adventure. He currently serves


as chief


CRM/AMRM instructor for Oregon Aero.


He may be contacted at: info@randymains.com


rotorcraftpro.com


9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88