search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
“Ninety percent of all aviation accidents are related to human factors and human performance,” said Dudley Crosson, a physiologist who founded Delta P in 1988. “Yet whenever pilots go for training, the great majority of their training is focused on system failures. We need to start taking human factors more seriously because they are causing most of the accidents.”


A List of Problems


It is well-known that the global aviation industry is short of pilots. Moreover, this shortage just keeps growing as more rotorcraft and fixed-wing aircraft enter service, and more pilots of Baby Boomer vintage retire.


One reason older pilots retire is the injuries they suffer from years of flying. “I deal with


people who have to quit due to years of neck and back strain caused by wearing helmets and night vision goggles,” said Crosson. “Add the years of sitting in cockpits without getting enough exercise, and it adds up. I want pilots who retire to be able to lift up their grandkids, but often this isn’t happening.”


Another reason pilots quit is because years of constant fatigue catch up with them; compromising not just


their


health, but their interest in the job. Then there’s the stress that a flying career can create, which some pilots and aircrew members attempt to dampen through self- medication. Over time, it all adds up.


Sometimes pilots and aircrew members are forced to retire due to medical conditions that could be effectively treated and reported without destroying their flight


rotorcraftpro.com 83


status. Unfortunately, the fear of losing their careers due to medical conditions, and not knowing how to navigate the FAA’s bureaucracy safely, keeps some pilots from dealing with health issues until it is too late.


The takeaway is: Some pilots are retiring sooner than preferred due to human factors. Others remain flying at lower performance levels than the job demands. Either way, none of this is necessary. No pro sports team would expect its players to do their best without competent physiological and psychological support, so why should pilots and aircrews be held to an unrealistic higher standard?


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92